Good and Bad Behavior

posted January 15th, 2007 by
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Q. We have a Labrador retriever, almost a year old, who jumps up on us all the time. We can hardly walk outside without him jumping all over us. He knocks down the kids, and is impossible to pet because he’s so wild. Will he outgrow this?

A. The short answer is, no, he will not outgrow this. He is jumping on you to get attention, and if he spends a lot of time outdoors alone, he is lonely! You can, however, teach him how you would like him to greet people. The first step is to prevent him from practicing this behavior, especially when children are present. The goal is for him to sit as an alternative to jumping up on people. You can accomplish this without using harsh methods such as kneeing the dog in the chest, which are ineffective and potentially dangerous to dogs and people.

To begin, set aside 15 minutes that you can spend working with your dog without any other people or animals around. Practice in the area where he is used to greeting people. Have a good supply of really yummy dog treats in your pocket, or fanny pack. With a treat in your hand, step toward the dog, into his space, and while he has four feet on the ground, give him the treat. Keep the treats coming as long as he has four feet on the ground. You can step into the dog’s space or you can turn away from the dog, but you must only reward when he has four feet on the ground.

To teach sit, you will let the dog sniff and lick the treat in your hand, but don’t let him eat it. Lure the dog using the treat so that while he is licking, you cause his nose to point upward. While his nose follows the treat, his knees will bend and his rump will touch the ground. At that exact moment, give him the treat, say, “Sit,” and follow with a “Good Boy!” Lure him with the food only a few more times, then wait for him to sit voluntarily. He will, and then you will reward him with treats and praise. Again, wait for him to sit voluntarily and reward him.

Practice a few times alone with the dog, and then recruit an adult volunteer. Now the praise and reward will come from the other person. The dog will anticipate getting food, and will try what worked before…the sit!

As your dog learns to sit when a person approaches, he will also be learning to sit to accept petting. As he sits, and you praise him, pet him with long strokes. If he gets up, you will say “anh anh” and remind him again to sit.


Q. I’m the proud owner of a 10 week old puppy. He’s doing really great in most areas, but he bites at our hands all the time and even draws blood. How do we stop him when he bites?

A. Congratulations on your new addition! I suspect he is really mouthing rather than biting you. All puppies go through a process of learning bite inhibition. They begin using their teeth on their mother and their littermates in play, to get resources, when they’re mad, or when they’re excited. We must teach them that humans are not tough like their siblings nor do we like to be treated like chew toys. It takes lots of patience on your part and lots and lots of practice to help him learn to use his teeth appropriately.

The first step is to“yelp” like a puppy would when his sibling bites hard. When you receive a “bite” that is particularly sharp, make a high-pitched “ouch” sound, and stop petting or playing. You may see the puppy retreat slightly, which is a good sign. You should act offended, and he should act sorry. You will probably repeat this process several times in a row, and if he persists, just end the interaction. Walk away, do not continue giving him attention.

Offer him a toy to chew on instead of your hands. As you are petting, grooming, or playing with your puppy and he puts his teeth on you, firmly say, “No Bite.” As you say this, rest his chin in the palm of one hand, so that your fingers curl upward and gently around his lips (not over the top of his muzzle), and place your other hand on his collar. Hold him very gently, as if you were holding a bird in your hands. You should see his tongue quickly flick out and lick his lips. That’s his way of apologizing. When you see this, remove your hands, pet him gently and tell him that he is a good boy.

Never discipline a puppy by shaking him, spanking him, or clamping down on his muzzle. Never tease him with your hand gestures. Play with toys with him rather than your body!

Mary Green, Certified Pet Dog Trainer, is the owner of K9 Manners & More in Broken Arrow. She is a consultant for the Tulsa SPCA, trainer for TheraPetics Service Dogs of OK, and is a monthly guest on the KOTV Noon News.

Story by Mary Green

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