Dog Training

posted July 15th, 2007 by
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Story by Mary Green

Q. How do I keep my 30 lb. dog from lumbering across my lap and trying to exit the car before I can get out first?  I get a mouth full of red dog fur, not to mention being squished.

A.  The quick solution is to have your dog secured in the car by using a car harness.  The harness attaches to the lap or shoulder seat belt.  Bolting through any open door, be it the front door, car door, or gate, can be a dangerous practice.  

Teach your dog to wait at openings and only proceed through when directed.  First, teach her to Sit and Wait to get a treat.  It’s easy!  Just instruct her to Sit, then tell her to Wait.  Use your hand like a stop sign showing her the palm of your hand to reinforce waiting.  After a couple of seconds, tell her good girl, and let her come to get the treat.  Gradually increase the length of time she has to wait.  

Over time, repeat the process at all the places she would be likely to bolt.  For the car, practice in the garage or another secure area, and make her wait while you gather your belongings, take the key out, open the car door – and finally get out.  She should not be invited out until you have control of her leash.


Q.  We have two Shih Tzu dogs.  One is 6 yrs. old and the other is 5 yrs. old.  They are house-trained, but when I’m at work during the day or when we are asleep in the night, they will sometimes wake me to go outside, and other times, they just pee.  I clean the carpets continually, but I always smell dog pee.  How in the world will I ever get them to stop?  Are they doing it to spite me?  I know they are capable of holding it for 8 hrs.

A.  There are many reasons why dogs eliminate in the wrong place, but they really don’t do it out of spite.  First, rule out any potential medical issues that could be masquerading as behavior problems.  If the dogs are male, and un-neutered, the behavior may be urine marking.  Neutering can help reduce marking.  If the dogs are spayed females, there may be a problem of a leaky bladder, which can be helped through medication.  A urinary tract infection can also cause a dog to have accidents.  

If there are no medical reasons for the misbehavior, you can address other causes.   First of all, going from a full bladder to an empty bladder feels very good to the dog – and becomes very self-rewarding!  If you need to go…go! It can be caused by bad habit and reinforced by lingering odor.  The next time you clean the carpets, rent or purchase a black light and thoroughly check for spots.  Clean with a good enzymatic cleaner, such as Nature’s Miracle or Simple Solution, and re-check with the black light.

Management such as crating or confining the dogs while you are gone can prevent accidents.  Perhaps you can install a doggie door so that they can go out as they need to.  You could teach them how to ring a dog doorbell to give them a clear way to indicate that they need to go out.  In the morning, and when you first come home from work, take them out to potty twice in a short period of time.  If they have been outside for a long period of time, let them know it’s Last Call.  Be sure they go potty before you let them in.  If they are sneaking off to go potty, use a baby gate to keep them in the bedroom at night.  Or put a jingle bell on their collar so you can hear them if they stir.  Do not allow them to tank up on a full bowl of water before bed time, or before you leave them for a long period.

Q.   I live in the Tulsa metro-area and I own a herding breed dog.  I would like to learn more about herding livestock and maybe earning herding titles with my dog.  Can you give me some ideas about the characteristics of a potential herding dog and how I can get started?

A.  It can be said that every dog needs a job.  But unemployed herding breeds, such as Border collies, cattle dogs (heelers), collies, and Australian shepherds, can get into a lot of trouble by practicing herding behavior on children, cats and cars.  If your dog has a keen instinct to chase things that move, or see if he can make things move, and has the drive to keep up the game, he may do well on stock.  Herding dogs must work closely under the direction of their handler, by verbal commands or whistle commands.  They are never allowed to endanger the stock.  In competitions, dogs may herd sheep, cattle, and even ducks!  There are several organizations that sponsor herding trials where you can earn titles with your dog.  I’m only familiar with the AKC.  There is a newly formed club, 4-Corners Herding Association which will offer herding clinics and trials.  Their website is www.4cornersherdingassociation.com.  A Google search of “getting started in herding” would be a good way to find more information.

Mary Green, Certified Pet Dog Trainer, is the owner of K9 Manners & More in Broken Arrow.  She is a consultant for the Tulsa SPCA, trainer for TheraPetics Service Dogs of OK, and is a monthly guest on the KOTV Noon News.   www.k9-manners.com

Have a training question for October?  Email [email protected].

 

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