Dog Training 911

posted January 14th, 2013 by
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by Mary Green

Q We have a decent sized back yard, and our dog gets to run and play there as much as he wants. But I always hear that you should take your dog for a walk every day for exercise. Is that really necessary?

A There are a lot of reasons why walks are considered a necessary part of your dog’s behavioral wellness. If your dog just goes outside to “do his business” and doesn’t really rip and run, he may be under-exercised. If he is running the fence with neighbor dogs, he may be over stimulated. If he is left in the yard without human companionship, he is not getting necessary socialization.

The yard can become pretty boring if you aren’t adding interesting things like food delivery toys, or interactive toys on a regular basis. When he is out for a walk, your dog can learn about his neighborhood. Besides getting physical exercise, he is taking in all the sights and, more importantly, the scents of the area. A short walk can really tire him out.

There are indoor games as well that help alleviate boredom and give your dog mental exercise. Toys that deliver food are wonderful. There is a wide array from Kong toys, to Buster Cubes, to Kibble Nibble. Some food delivery toys are also chew-toys, but some are not. There are interactive puzzle toys in which the dog has to problem solve in order to get the treats. Any game that encourages a dog to use his nose is another great way to exercise your dog.

Q I have a puppy that is about 5 months old. This is not the first puppy that I’ve raised, and I’ve never had a pup this difficult. I’ve always trained them on my own at home, but I feel this one is more than I can handle. Should I take him to obedience classes?

A Puppies, like children, are as different as night and day. Your previous puppies may have been of a different breed. Your current puppy could be the same breed as you’ve had before, but could be atypical (or maybe your last puppy was atypical for the breed). And, as we get older we are perhaps less tolerant of puppy behavior. Difficult is hard to define. A pup could be difficult to house-train but easy to take for a walk. He could be difficult on a car ride but easily crate-trained.

Training classes are a great first step toward forging a better relationship with your pet. K9 Manners & More classes are full of people who are on their way to having that well mannered pet that is a real part of the family. There is also a social aspect of being in a class with other people who are going through your same challenges. It’s fun to see your friends in class whether you’re a dog or a person! Ask your veterinarian for a referral to a training class, and do your homework to find the class that is right for you.

Q Can dogs and cats ever get along?

A Sure! If the dog and the cat are both members of the family, it can take some work to get along, but it can work. The first step is careful introduction of the new pet to the established family pet. Say, for example, you are bringing home a dog that you don’t know is cat-safe or not. You must first ensure the safety of the cat. Be sure that the dog does not have any opportunity to chase the cat. He can be confined in a crate when supervision isn’t possible, and be carefully supervised—on leash— when introductions are being made. If the cat bolts, and the dog chases… it’s game on! Prevent the dog from being able to do chase.

Cats that are outdoors are particularly at risk of being attacked by dogs. Dogs view them as intruders the same as squirrels. And dogs outside tend to pack-up on cats, even if individually they seem to get along. 

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