Training 911 – Stop the Jumping!

posted February 8th, 2015 by
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Training 911

Training 911

by Khara Criswell, MA, CPDT-KSA, CNWI

STOP THE JUMPING! You come home from work, and your dog is so happy to see you, he leaps into the air and hugs you. You then realize his paws are covered in mud or something worse.

Instead of requesting a sit or touch, you yell at the dog for greeting you. Maybe you yell “Down” or “Get away!” but the only thing the dog hears is the tone and inflection in your voice. What is a responsible dog owner to do to eliminate the jumping?

There are a number of ways you can teach your dog not to jump. Remember, do not hit the dog or step on the dog. When you start training, you should start with the highest value reward first—for most dogs, a treat or a toy. You can take away the treat and use other rewards when your dog has learned the opposite behavior.

I usually tell clients they can decide if they want 7/10 to 10/10, meaning if I ask my dog to sit 10 times and the dog sits 8 out of the 10, I have an 80 percent sit rate with my dog. An important point to remember is, keep the training consistent. Here are some options:

Option 1:

  1. Your dog jumps up; you leave the area. Go into the nearest room or outside the house and shut the door only for a second or two.
  2. When you come out, approach your dog. You can ask for a sit or touch; if the dog doesn’t jump up, you mark or say “good girl/boy.” (If you have a clicker device for clicker training, use it in this step.) Next, you give the reward—a “treat/toy/pet/verbal praise.”
  3. If the dog jumps up, repeat the leaving of the area.

Option 2:

  1. The dog jumps up; standing like a tree, arms crossed, say, “Off.”
  2. Allfour paws are on the floor. Now you can pet him or her.Kneel down to the dog’s level.
  3. Ask for a sit. Mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker” and give the reward with a “treat/toy/pet/verbal praise.”

Option 3:

  1. The dog jumps up; lean into your dog’s space and say, “Off.” (Some dogs may not like you in their inner space. Do not do this with strange dogs.)
  2. Allfour paws are on the floor. Now you can pet him. Kneel down to your dog’s level.
  3. Ask for a sit. Mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker” and give the reward with a treat/toy/pet/verbal praise.”

Option 4:

  1. You come home from work or walk into the house, your dog jumps up. Turn your back and start talking aloud or walk over to a window and describe what you see.
  2. Allfour paws are on the floor. Now you can pet your dog. Kneel down to his or her level.
  3. Ask for a sit. Mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker” and give the reward with a “treat/toy/pet/verbal praise.”

Option 5:

  1. You are letting your dog inside the house from being outside. As soon as the dog sees your hand on the door handle, he starts to jump up. You take your hand off of the door handle, and when the dog is calm, you put your hand back on the door handle. Play this game until the dog is calm when you are touching the door handle.
  2. If the dog jumps up when you start to open the door, then close the door. You slowly open the door. If the dog gets too excited, you can close the door. Once the dog is calm, you can open the door to let the dog in. Mark with “good girl/boy/clicker.”

Option 6: Premack Principle

According to Intropsych.com, Premack’s Principle, or the relativity theory of reinforcement, states that more probable behaviors reinforce less probable behaviors. Essentially, if your dog wants the reward, he or she will perform the desired activity required by you to get to that reward.

You teach your dog to jump up and get excited by dancing around or tossing a toy. When the dog jumps up, mark “good girl/boy/clicker” and give a reward with petting only.

Then, you immediately ask for a sit. Mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker.” Reward with a “treat/toy” and ask for the hug or jump up again.

Eventually, you will fade the treat/toy reward, and your dog will sit for a hug/jump up.

Option 7: Hand Target

While facing your dog, hold your finger or your open hand a few inches away from the dog’s nose.

When he or she sniffs your hand or the target to investigate, mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker” and reward him or her with a treat.

Repeat several times, and then move your hand to the left, right, up and down. Each time the dog touches the target, mark or say “good boy/girl/clicker.” Next, reward with a treat.

When the dog comes running over to jump on you, stick out your hand; your dog should stop to nose-touch it. Mark or say “good girl/boy/clicker.” Reward him or her by petting or with a toy.

The important thing to remember is consistency. Before long, the jumping days will be over, and you will find a better behaved pooch in your home.

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