Author Archives: Steve

Dog Food for the Slow Cooker

posted April 29th, 2016 by
Dog Food

Dog Food

Dog Food for the Slow Cooker

Written By Amica Graber

2016.04.20 – 4:45pm

The harmful impacts of processed dog food are frequently underplayed. Meat is often sourced from the abattoir leftovers, and according to one horrific exposé, even euthanized pets can sometimes go into the manufacture of dog food.

On the flipside, preparing your dog’s meals at home can save you cash, and some say that it can help your dog live longer.

I can barely throw my own meals together, so if you’re skeptical — I get it. Luckily, there has always been one invention in my kitchen that has been a godsend when I can’t get it together: the slow cooker.

Slow cooking your dog’s meals takes all of the hard work out of cooking. Have you got a refrigerator drawer of crumpled-looking carrots that you abandoned in favor of takeout? Throw ‘em in the slow cooker for your lil buddy! Didn’t get round to finishing that chicken? TO THE SLOW COOKER!

But, there are some caveats to DIY dog food. For some reason, feeding dogs cheese is pretty popular right now. I fed my dog cheese once, and perhaps he has a touch of Gwyneth Paltrow about him, but it made him sick as — well, a dog.

Dogs love eating cheese. So do I, for that matter. However, dogs don’t have the lactase in their stomachs to break it down efficiently, which can lead to diarrhea (check), odious gas (double check), and even long-term digestion issues.

To navigate the murky land of knowing what to feed your pet, we designed this nifty infographic to make it as easy as pie.

Slow Cooker Dog Food

We Did It!

posted April 16th, 2016 by
Holiday Gift

We Did It!!!!

We Did ItOn April 18, 2015 – we officially opened our doors to the public.  It was raining and we didn’t care.  At the time, in publications, we stated the following:

This is the mission of PAAS. “Peaceful Animal Adoption Shelter will work with the city, county and state officials to increase public awareness of overpopulation issue. PAAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to rescue homeless and abused dogs and cats. We will be able to provide them temporary care until we can find them their “forever homes”

We have far exceeded our expectations, but the journey to get to where we are today is much different than the original concept.  We have saved more than 500+ dogs/cats/puppies/kittens and made an impact on feral cat overpopulation – 200+ have been “fixed” and returned to their natural habitats.  The 500 number alone makes all of us smile – – we did it – – we really did it.  The original concept would be local adoptions – the solution has been transport out-of-state. And, when we look in the eyes of a scared dog and know they will soon have a good home in a different state, we know we’re making a difference.

We’ve also begun a dog training program in cooperation with the Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center.  From my personal experience, I know how rewarding these programs are – not only for the inmates who participate – – but for the dogs who learn trust, love and obedience.

Looking to the future – it is bright – – it involves lots of Willie Nelson “On the Road Again” music and hundreds of dogs and cats heading down the road to their new homes.  PAAS is making a difference.

Thanks, to all of you, who support us financially, bring toys, blankets, dog/cat food, kitty litter and, most importantly, walk our dogs – – – each of you have played a key role in our success.  Give yourself a pat on the back.

Ozzy’s Tale

posted April 15th, 2016 by
Coconut Oil

Ozzy’s Tale

By Holly Brady Clay

How One Dog’s Story Became A Book And Is Still Teaching Lessons Along The Way

It has been said, “Saving one dog will not change the world, but surely for that one dog, the world will change forever.” I believe this is true more than ever. Let me introduce Ozzy to you (also known as Scooburt), my lovable 8-year-old mutt I adopted when he was 18 months old. The decision to adopt Ozzy was the absolute best “worst” decision I ever made. 

Ozzy was very “special” from the beginning. It was not until I stood at the desk of the shelter to adopt Ozzy that I heard his very fascinating backstory.  Ozzy had previously been adopted—twice—before being returned to the shelter both times by his previous owners. It seems his former owners, who shamed Ozzy by changing his name to Winston, owned a delicate set of china dolls.  Maybe he was speaking out in angst against his newfound dog name, but, whatever his motive, he did not waste any time shredding the dolls to pieces, leaving his new owners a little more than frustrated. While for some this should have been a warning sign, I ignored all indications that he might be trouble. If I had only known what I was getting myself into! 

The day I drove Ozzy home from the shelter I experienced what I refer to as the “bad side of Ozzy.” While in line at Petsmart—my cart full of overpriced toys and dog food, all of which I really couldn’t afford—Ozzy chewed through his leash and broke free. If that wasn’t warning enough, the next indication he was special was the countless undergarments Ozzy stealthily stole and tore up, which belonged to my wonderful and ever-so patient roommate. Another indication he was “special” was the fact that he ran away from me every single chance he could as I embarrassingly chased him for miles down the road.

Call it blind love, but from the day I brought him home it truly was love at first sight. I always compare it to what my mother would tell me as a child: “It doesn’t matter how many mistakes you make, I could never stop loving you.” Well, I didn’t have a biological human child that I carried in my womb for 9 months and then miraculously gave birth to, but I finally got what she meant after all those years. No matter what he did, I still loved him. He followed me everywhere. I couldn’t be out of his sight. 

I never even knew I needed a companion in the bathroom with me! Because of this “needy” bond, we had some issues when I would leave the house. It was nothing major; a few loaves of bread would go missing, and a package of potato chips here and there disappeared mysteriously. There was also the time he stole an entire birthday cake.  Oh, and the entire plate of hamburgers that vanished. There was the dozen or so bagels incident, a tub of cream cheese, a whole pineapple, (yes, whole with the prickly covering) bananas, avocados, and potatoes… Suffice it to say, Ozzy had some learning to do. 

Through the years and with much patience, Ozzy has matured into a very well-behaved dog. We moved to Colorado together as I finished up my undergraduate degree in film, video and media. I have always been drawn to a creative lifestyle and often find myself documenting stories, whether through writing, photography or film. So one cold, wintery day in the small, mountain valley where I resided, I grabbed a pen and paper and started writing. I looked at Ozzy, and endless stories popped into my head. How could they not? I wish I could say all this just happened overnight, and then “poof!” I had a book. Quite honestly, it took me several years to find the motivation to complete my story, but once I did, the book title seemed obvious: “Scooburt Steals a Meatball.” 

What better story to write about than a dog that steals food! I submitted it to Tate Publishing out of Mustang, Okla., and together we collaborated to bring Ozzy’s story to life. This could not have been done without the help from one truly amazing friend, Zay Shaeffer. Zay, an Oklahoma native, is responsible for all of the artwork in the book, and he is truly a present day Dr. Seuss. He invokes passion and humor into every single one of his art pieces, and because of this, I knew he had to do the artwork for the book. 

The premise behind the book is about Scooburt stealing a meatball from a Great Meatball Clerk, but then understanding what he did was wrong. The lesson goes much deeper than that, delving into what it means to have a conscience and how we determine right from wrong. It is a humorous tale of a tail but with a great message for kids. The book was finalized and released in the summer of 2012. Since then, we have had many great opportunities to share Ozzy’s story, as well as the importance of adopting shelter pets. Ozzy and I have traveled throughout Oklahoma, visiting numerous elementary schools. Our main goal behind visiting schools is not only the one-on-one interaction that students are given with having a dog visit their school, but also to teach them kindness to animals.

It is also important to help them understand if they have a dream, nothing can stop them from pursuing it. I explain that I wanted to write children’s books from an early age and made it happen with perseverance. When you are 8 years old and a dog visits your school, it is safe to assume the dog must be famous. We hear kids screaming from the hall-ways about the famous Scooburt! Kids line up for hugs, and Ozzy adores them. Sometimes a good hug from a dog is all you need to turn your day around. 

As far as continuing the Scooburt series, I do have plans    for more books in the near future. You can stay up-to-date on “The Adventures of Scooburt Humperdink” by visiting    our Facebook page at facebook.com/scooburthumperdink or visiting our website (hollybrady.tatepublishing.com). For signed copies, send us a Facebook message.

Seven years later, Ozzy and I have been through some rough patches, but I wouldn’t trade him (or the experiences together) for the world. Just like so many things in life, with patience and willpower we can make anything happen. I believe the same was true for my book, as well as Ozzy. He needed someone to believe in him, and I knew I could be that person. Adopting a dog isn’t easy, but it is so rewarding. Everyone can do his or her part.

As for Ozzy, he thinks I changed his world forever, but he has no idea how much he has changed mine. 

Companion Animals

posted April 12th, 2016 by
Companion Animals

Companion Animals benefit the residents of Leisure Village

by Kim Shoemake

Companion AnimalsAn elderly woman sits quietly watching a movie, occasionally nodding at a visitor or staff member as they pass. The pitter patter of paws on the floor distracts her from her thoughts. A smile slowly creeps across her face that could light up even the cloudiest of days. It’s as though the little dog has decided she’s on a mission. As she’s placed in the woman’s lap, it is obvious the two are smitten with one another. The gentle Maltese looks at her with eyes that could melt even the coldest hearts. It is moments like this one that make Jodi Lum, activities director at Leisure Village Healthcare Community in Tulsa, grateful to be a part of something that clearly gives her residents so much joy. “Animals have this innate ability to know who needs them the most. Our residents get so excited when they know the animals are coming for a visit.”
When it comes to treating the human body, doctors and nurses are fully aware
that the health of their patients is as much an issue of mental well being as it physical. In working with residents in skilled nursing facilities, this approach could not be more relevant. Studies show that regular interaction with animals has a therapeutic effect on seniors, in particular those who are separated from family. From lowering of blood pressure to elevated mood, the positive effects have been proven time and again by medical professionals who are often at a loss as to why animals have such a profoundly positive effect on the humans around them.
Companion AnimalsFor these reasons, Leisure Village partnered with the PAL program of the Tulsa SPCA to allow residents the opportunity to spend time with dogs, many of which are rescues of the organization. Debbie Atteberry, a volunteer with the PAL program for 14 years, first began working with seniors and animals because she wanted to do something with her dogs and help the community at the same time. She never imagined just how much she’d love it and still looks forward to going to see the residents. She’s not kidding herself though. She knows the real stars of the show are the dogs, who clearly love every bit of the attention lavished upon them. The PAL motto is “a lap is a terrible thing to waste.” The residents of Leisure Village are happy to ensure that never happens.

Easter Egg Hunts, Round Two!

posted April 5th, 2016 by
Nicole Castillo

Easter Egg Hunts, Round Two!

Revenge of the Devil Wind!

Easter Egg Hunts

Easter Egg HuntsCheyanne and I embarked on our second egg hunt of the year at the Edmond Parks and Recreation Hound Hunt. Raising Canes had a tent set up, handing out lemonade and tea, inviting the crowds to play a game for doggy prizes. They brought along the best bunny I’ve seen for dogs. This person in a bunny suit came in quietly and stayed toward the back of the crowd. Dog parents, like myself, approached and took pictures with bunny with minimal chaos. Superb.
This year, Raising Canes “hid the eggs” as well. I learned more about the back story of the name Raising Canes, which was the owner’s yellow lab’s name, and also a new puppy christened with the same title. Raising Canes is eager to lend a hand to help the area pets in need and also who want to spend an afternoon hunting plastic eggs with treats in them. The Edmond Parks and Rec ladies came in later to direct the hunt. All was going smoothly until a devil wind blew through and sent a Raising Canes sign twisting through the spring air. It passed right through the crowd and caused an excited rumble. The gusty presence sped up the beginning of the hunt and off we went. My senior dog, Cheyanne, happily walked around watching the other excited dogs go nuts over the eggs. I picked up a handful of eggs for her, but only a few, her elderly dog tummy cannot handle too many treats. The Edmond Hound Hunt is an ideal event because after the hunt, you can let your dogs go free and run off all those dog biscuits they just inhaled. People wander around, talking pets and making friends. Good job Raising Canes and Edmond Parks and Rec. Always a good time.Easter Egg Hunts
Now that the Easter season is gone, you may find yourself in the ownership of colorful plastic eggs. Here’s a few ways you can utilize them.

  • Throw some dry beans, pebbles or rice in them to make instant cat toys. If the plastic eggs have holes in them, you can fill half with catnip and delight your feline friends.
  • Use them to store your earphones. They won’t get tangled and the shape is super easy to find in your purse.
  • Roll up a few dog poo bags and close them in a plastic egg. You can toss one of these in your glove compartment or handbag so you’ll never be caught without them!
  • When packing for a trip, wrap earrings and rings in a tissue and tuck them in an egg. The bright color will make them easy to find in your luggage.
  • Spring is perfect for dog events, but cats also will be given a spotlight. An artistic spotlight. ‘Flora and Felines,’ a collection of paintings by O. Gail Poole, an Oklahoma artist, will be featured at the Myriad Botanical Gardens April 4-May 26. Check out their website or Facebook page for more information.

Oklahoma Standard

posted April 4th, 2016 by
Senior Advantage

Oklahoma Standard

 

Oklahoma StandardOklahomans set the Oklahoma Standard for rescue following the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City.  The rescue efforts truly showed Oklahomans at their finest and proved what can happen when everyone comes together for a common goal – to find survivors and account for everyone

 

Oklahoma City voters approved MAPS 1, MAPS2, and MAPS3 –  civic leaders and citizens worked together to present a well-thought-out, unified, opportunity to change the face of OKC.  Today Oklahoma City is recommended as a destination city in travel guides.  I can remember when they rolled up the sidewalks by 7:00 every night – there was nothing to do, see, eat, enjoy, attend.  Not so today.

 

We can set the standard in rural Oklahoma for responsible pet ownership.  At present, hundreds of rescues, individuals, and municipal shelters daily face the sad fact that wonderful, adoptable, lovable animals do not get a chance to live because they are homeless or unwanted.  This past weekend, PAAS transported 13 to Denver Dumb Friends League (don’t let the name fool you), held a successful PetSmart adoption event (13 adoptions) on Saturday at the Stapleton PetSmart in Denver and have two living in a Colorado foster home.  Hundreds of dogs from rural. Oklahoma were transported by car, van, transport bus or plane.  They shared one thing in common  – they were homeless in Oklahoma, but they wouldn’t be once they left the state.

 

When you work in rescue, there are dogs that speak to your heart and you’re forever changed.  Some of them, for me, have been Blackie, Brownie, Megan, TuffTuff, and Daisy.  Look in the mirror, talk with your friends, figure it out, then get together with others.  We can set the Oklahoma Standard – – YES, WE CAN.