Author Archives: Steve

Do the Math

posted October 30th, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Do the Math

Do the Math.  It’s true – there’s an Oklahoma Standard when it comes to helping in time of great need.  I witnessed it first hand following the Murrah Bombing and one of the devastating Moore tornadoes.  Recently, that Oklahoma ability to come together during a tragedy happened on the campus of Oklahoma State University.

If only that standard could be a part of the world of rescue.

We opened our doors in late April.  It quickly became apparent we would need to transport out-of-state if we wanted to save some of the homeless dogs that came into our facility.  It felt wonderful to quickly find organizations in Colorado and Wyoming that needed our dogs.  However, this great feeling of accomplishment only lasted for a few days.  Then we do the math and reality hits us and we’re once again looking for organizations out-of-state to help us.

What we are really saying is:  We don’t have an Oklahoma Standard when it comes to saving the lives of homeless dogs and cats.  We’re just sending our problems to someone else.  I know, for a fact, that Colorado is beginning to take notice and I won’t be surprised if they enact some changes.

Here’s the math for three months – – from three rescues.  A total of 584 – – YES – – 584 dogs were transported out-of-state.  Look at an Oklahoma map – – the Vinita/ surrounding area can be multiplied by at least 5 (or more) and when you do the math you begin to realize in all probability more than 2,500 dogs found new homes out-of-state.

We can set the Oklahoma standard.  Support spay/neuter clinics, be sure your pets are “fixed” or look in the mirror and understand that as the weather turns cold, the roads become treacherous, all of us will send fewer dogs out-of-state.  However, that doesn’t mean fewer dogs needs homes – it just means more dogs will die.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

Connection

posted October 23rd, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Connection

There is documented evidence of the connection between domestic, elder, animal and child abuse.  Sadly, they are all too prevalent in our society.  All you have to do is ask anyone who works in rescue, child welfare, law enforcement, education or religion.

 

For all the negative aspects, there is hope of breaking the cycle of violence through intervention.  One proven, winning, solution has been the interaction between animals, especially dogs, with those have a history of being the recipients of abuse – or were the abuser themselves.

 

My first encounter with the latter was the dog training program at Lexington Prison.  Thanks to a documentary underwritten by the Kirkpatrick Foundation, The Dogs of Lexington, tells the redemptive story of shelter dogs, prisoners, and people.  Sarge was a growly, grumpy, nippy schnauzer mix, deemed unadoptable.  Today Sarge is the resident therapy dog for the Norman, Oklahoma Veterans Center.  I personally watched the magic happen.

 

Last school year, I spent one day with middle school students in rural Oklahoma.  It was disheartening to realize how many of their lives were chaotic, except in the classroom.  The value of therapy dogs in schools, like this one, would pay rich rewards as the students transition through high school and then try to find their place in society.

 

What I have learned is that doing nothing – – solves nothing.  The abuse continues, more lives are affected and the cycle grows and grows and grows.  It has to stop somewhere – it can stop with you, the person reading this article.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

Pet Travel Guide

posted October 23rd, 2015 by
Pet Travel

PET TRAVEL GUIDE

Pet Travel is becoming more and more popular. Bringing your pet on holidays with you adds to the fun of your trip and alleviates the worry of not knowing what’s happening with them while you’re away. Before travelling, you need to do your homework. Planes and cars aren’t designed with animals in mind. You also need to know what to expect when you do reach your final destination. There are a lot of rules and restrictions in place from country to country. By planning your pet travel ahead of time, you can make your hard earned holiday a truly relaxing time for everyone involved. To help you and your jet-setting animal companions, Greyhounds As Pets have produced an infographic that shows you the most important things you need to know about taking them on holidays with you. The Website URL is http://www.gapnsw.com.au/dogs-for-apartments/

Tom Clarke
Marketing Manager

greyhounds as pets
Building B| 1 Homebush Bay Drive Rhodes NSW 2138
t : 02 87 67 0535 | f : 02 97 64 6244
Website: www.gapnsw.com.au

Pet Travel

Lost and Found in OKC

posted October 21st, 2015 by
Organic Squeeze

Lost and Found in OKC

Pet Lost and Found can be a harrowing experience

These guidelines are thanks to OKC Animal Welfare

Lost Pet:

Not being able to find your pet is an especially traumatic experience. Here are some helpful tips that will increase your chances of finding him or her.

 

Visit our Shelter Daily:

OKCAW takes in lost pets and stray animals every day at our shelter located at 2811 SE 29th steeet. Lost pets and stray animals are held for three days if they have no identification and five days if they are identified in order to provide you with enough time to visit the shelter and find your pet. If no one claims the animal during the holding time, the animal is evaluated for placement options. When you arrive at the shelter to look for your pet, go to the front counter and tell the staff member that you are looking for a lost pet. Bring in ID for yourself as well as for your animal. You will fill out a short form and a staff member will escort you through the building. While you’re at the shelter, take the time to look at every cage; this will eliminate the possibility of you passing a cage that your pet may be in. We recommend that you visit at least every two days.

 

Ask the front desk for a blue “lost card”.  Make sure to fill this out completely and in detail, and it will be posted on our lost and found board.

 

Search our Website’s Found Pets Database:

Pictures and/or descriptions of animals that have been brought to our Care Centers are posted on our website hourly. To search the database of found animals in our care:

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select Search for Pet
  • Animal Type: select which animal you are searching for
  • Animal Gender: select No Preference
  • Animal Age: Select No Preference
  • Animal Size: Select No Preference

 

The last page shows the most recent animals we have received.  Please start on the last page and work your way back to the beginning.  If you find an animal that resembles yours please write down the animal ID so that one of our representatives can point you in the right direction once you arrive at the shelter.

If you see an animal that fits the description of your lost pet, visit the shelter to reclaim your pet. Please make sure you come in with the animal identification number from the website and pictures of your animals for identification purposes.

 

File a Lost Pet Report Online:

A report filed with OKCAW will be entered into an online database that searches our computer records and will send you information if there is a match. This report will be valid for 30 days and will continue to send you information if applicable during those 30 days.

When filing the Lost Pet report, please remember to upload a photo of your lost pet (a clear full body photo, if possible). Also, please leave the top check-off box unchecked so to allow a copy of your report to be sent to OKCAW. If you check this box, our Lost and Found will not be able to reach you if a match is made.

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select I Lost a Pet
  • Click the appropriate link for dog or cat
  • Fill out the report with as much detail as possible
  • Attach a photo of your pet
  • Click the “Submit Request” button

 

Found Pets:

Thank you for taking care of the lost pet you have found. Below is a list of options to assist you in locating the family of the lost pet.

If the animal has identification, contact the owner. Identification comes in many forms, so please check the animal thoroughly for a tag, tattoo or microchip. You can bring an animal to most shelters and veterinary hospitals to scan the animal for a microchip. Some owners write their phone number on their pet’s collar. If the animal has an OKCAW rabies tag, call 405-297-3100 during normal business hours or send us an email to [email protected] and we will return your message as soon as possible.

 

Bring to the Pet to OKCAW:

If the animal was found in Oklahoma City, you may bring it to the shelter. OKCAW takes in lost pets and stray animals every day from 9am-5:45pm at our shelter located at 2811 SE 29th St in Oklahoma City. Lost pets are put on hold for three days if they have no identification or five days if there is identification in order to provide the owners with enough time to locate their pets. After three or five days, the animal gets evaluated and made available for placement. Note: If you are a finder of a lost pet and are interested in adopting the pet after the hold period, please be at the facility by noon on the day the hold period is up to adopt. All adoption criteria apply.

Please note that all animals that come into our care are scanned for a microchip. If the animal has a current chip or other form of identification, we make every attempt to contact the owner to reunite them with their pet.

 

Keep the Pet at Your Home:

If you want to keep the animal during the hold period, please come to the shelter to fill out a green “found card” (ask the front desk for one).  We will post this form on our lost and found board in the building. Also, file a found report on our website.

File a Found Pet Report Online:

A report filed with OKCAW will be entered into an online database that searches our computer records and will send you information if there is a match. This report will be valid for 30 days and will continue to send you information if applicable during those 30 days.

When filing the Found Pet report, please remember to upload a photo of the found pet (a clear full body photo, if possible). Also, please leave the top check-off box unchecked so to allow a copy of your report to be sent to OKCAW. If you check this box, our Lost and Found will not be able to reach you if a match is made.

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select I Found a Pet
  • Click the appropriate link for dog or cat
  • Fill out the report with as much detail as possible
  • Attach a photo of your pet
  • Click the “Submit Request” button

 

Other Tips on Locating the Owners of a Found Pet:

Post flyers within a 2-mile radius of where you found the pet. Your flyer should include a detailed description of the animal, pictures and your contact information. Post this flyer with permission in as many places around the neighborhood as possible: pet shops, veterinarian and doctors offices, supermarkets, police precincts, bulletin boards, bus stops, taxi services, laundromats, delivery people, schools, etc. If someone responds to your flyer, make sure you see proof of ownership prior to releasing the pet to the person. Pictures work best. Do not forget to remove all flyers once the pet is reunited with his or her owner.

Place an ad in local and state newspapers, as well as in online publications. Most newspapers do this free of charge. You may also create a Twitter account and/or Facebook Page.

Getting Dumped

posted October 16th, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Getting DumpedGetting Dumped

Getting dumped in the country is not OK.  Not sure why too many pet owners make the decision that it is.  While they may think that the farmers/ranchers in this area are just waiting for a new dog or cat to join the clan – – the real answer is not hardly – – no way.

I realized just how frustrating it is for all of us today when I got royally chewed out by a very irate person.  She had lots of dogs and a few cats/kittens that needed new homes today and she wanted to bring them to the shelter.  Once she heard the word “no” in our response the conversation did not go well.  Did she yell – – absolutely;  was she mad – – without question; did it change the situation – – no.

The area shelters and rescues work tirelessly to find homes for as many dogs and cats as possible.  All of us are committed to saving lives – – each organization may do it differently – but in the end – – we’ve collectively made a small dent in the problem.

The heartbreak is that for all our hard work and expense – there will still be more dogs and cats needing homes.

My ears are no longer ringing from the irate person on the other end of the line. I know it will happen again and again and again.  However, all I have to do is look into Megan’s eyes, or see Zelda go out the door purring – and even being yelled at with threatening words is still worth knowing we make a difference.  For me – it has been a significant contributor to my white hair.

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

posted October 12th, 2015 by
Blaze's

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue – October 12, 2015

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, Inc. located in Jones, Oklahoma, is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that strives to improve the lives of neglected, starved, and abused horses.  We provide equine rescue regardless of age or disability.  We promote and teach horse care and humane, natural methods of training horses.  Our primary focus is Animal Cruelty Cases.  We work closely with the Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division and the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office with their Equine related Animal Cruelty Cases.  We also assist any other local/rural county sheriff’s office who request our assistance.

Urgent Assistance Needed:

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue is asking for your assistance.  We understand that times are tight for many right now, but the smallest amount can go a long way in the rehabilitation of our rescued horses.  Our Donations and Adoptions have dropped dramatically and we are having to turn horses away that need rescued.  We have several horses that are waiting for much needed surgeries.  Please help, any amount that you can spare is greatly appreciated.  All donations are tax deductible and 100% of your donation goes towards the horses in our care.  Please consider making a donation today!  

 

Or Donate online at:

www.blazesequinerescue.com

If you are new to our program, please watch our video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SkqZy8lQm4

Here is a breakdown of our immediate needs:

Many of you may know Double D.  A beautiful horse that came into our rescue program shortly after Rudy arrived in January.  Double D and Rudy are best friends.  They both rely on each other for emotional support.  Double D has gone through 2 surgeries to remove squamous cell carcinoma from his eyelids and his penis.  He had several large masses on his penis that were excised by our Veterinarians.  We treated the cancer with cryosurgery and implantation of chemotherapy slow release beads on his eyelids and his penis.  Both appeared to be a huge success, however, the mass on his penis has returned and once again, he will need surgery.  This surgery will need to be much more aggressive to make sure they are able to get all the way to the cells that are producing the cancer, after the removal of the tumors, he will again be treated with the cryosurgery and implantation of chemotherapy slow release beads.  We are praying that this surgery will be successful and the mass will not grow back.  Double D is a happy horse and enjoys his days with Rudy.

In case you are just now learning of Rudy or Double D.  Please follow their stories here:

http://blazesequinerescue.com/Rudy.html or http://blazesequinerescue.com/Double%20D.html

You can also see a wonderful video of Rudy and Double D here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ym6SMrLDB_s

We also have another rare case!  Shemar came into our rescue program in April from the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office.  Shemar is a beautiful, Black, Quarter Horse Stud.  He is estimated to be 7 years of age.  He came in very thin, body score of a 3, infested with internal/external parasites.  Shemar appears to be a double crypt-orchid and will need surgery.  However, before we can address his needed surgery to remove his testicles, we have ran into some liver conditions.  Shemar shows no signs of being ill.  He is a happy go lucky horse and we would never know he was having any form of complications had we not pulled blood work prior to sending him to surgery.  Shemar’s blood work shows that he is going into some form of liver failure.  However, we don’t know what would be causing this.  We have taken Shemar to OSU for diagnosis and possible treatment.  However, I came back from OSU just as confused as I was before going.  If you have been following us for a while, you know that we always seem to have the rare cases.  OSU diagnosed Shemar with a rare disease, so rare, OSU has only seen it 3 times in the last 20 years.    

Sadly, we just didn’t find the positive answers we were hoping for. Shemar has been diagnosed with a severe Pulmonary Disease Due to “Multisystemic eosinophilic epitheliotropic Disease” (MEED). MEED occurs primarily in young horses, ranging in age from 3 to 13 years. The disease is histologically characterized by eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and the formation of eosinophilic granulomas in different organs. The clinical signs vary according to the organs affected. The prognosis of horses with MEED is invariably poor. However, attempted clinical management includes treatment with hydroxyurea and dexamethasone.

They still have a few tests that we are waiting on results to come back from, but we aren’t expecting any different of a diagnosis. Shemar’s liver is smaller than normal and due to the location we didn’t feel necessary to risk pulling a liver biopsy. So, that leaves us with a lot of thinking and deciding what is best for Shemar. We still have the fact that he is a stud and surgery is still needed.  His last diagnosis leaves me more confused, as he has done incredibly well since we returned home.  He has gained about 100 pounds, he looks amazing, and he seems to be feeling just as good as he looks.  However, his blood work still shows him to be in some form of liver failure.  If you know me, you know that I don’t give up easily on our horses.  I want to see Shemar live out the life he deserves.  I want him to be able to run in the pasture and play with other horses.  Before I can do that, we must prepare him for surgery.  At this time, OSU felt that he could still undergo surgery, as nothing shows that he physically can’t endure the surgery.  We need assistance to continue to proceed with getting Shemar the care he needs.  I just feel like there should be more answers available than what I am finding.  I am asking for you to please help me, help Shemar!

First picture is Shemar upon arrival, Second & Third picture is Shemar today!

Blaze’s Equine Rescue purchases grain weekly.  We spend $925.34 each week on the required grain we need to feed the horses in our rehabilitation program.

We purchase 24 round bales of hay weekly.  24 round bales with delivery cost us $1400.00 a week.  Sadly, we don’t have grass and have to feed hay year round.

We purchase shavings and fat supplements weekly.  Cost $294.75 a week

Our veterinarian expenses are much higher than our typical years past, due to the extreme medical cases that we have seen this year.  Typically we spend $30,773.92 a year.  We have currently already spent $40,570.45 this year alone on medical expenses and this is only October and we still have extreme cases that require a lot of medical care and expenses.  On average we spend $2500.00 to $5000.00 a month for veterinary care.  Keep in mind that is not only surgeries, etc., but also basic care such as pulling a negative coggins, vaccinations, deworming, teeth floating, castrations, injuries, physical examinations, lameness issues, etc.,  

Our farrier expenses average $500.00 every 2 weeks. 

It is an expensive endeavor caring for over 100 horses daily.  We can’t do this alone and we are asking for your assistance.  Please help us continue our rescue efforts. 

Of course that is only part of our everyday needs.  We also have many projects that we need completing, such as repairing structures and fencing for our rescued horses.  Our needs are always great.  We have saved over 1,290 horses in the last 15 years and we have adopted out One Thousand and Fifty Six horses to forever, loving homes. 

If you or anyone you know is looking to add a horse to their family, please check out our adoptable horses.  We have so many great horses seeking their forever, loving family.  Adoption is another great way of helping.  All adoption fee’s go back into the program to continue to assist other horses in need.  Adoption saves 2 lives.  The one you adopted and the one you opened up a place for a neglected horse to enter our program. 

Remember every little bit helps tremendously and we simply cannot thank you enough for your continued support.

Donations can be sent to:

17667 Markita Dr.  Jones, OK  73049

(405) 399-3084 or (405) 615-5267

[email protected] www.blazesequinerescue.com

Federal I.D. 43-2024364