Author Archives: Steve

Mustang Animal Shelter

posted November 12th, 2015 by
Mustang

OKC Pets Magazine toured the Mustang Animal  Shelter and took these pictures of adorable animals available for adoption. If you are thinking about a new family member, please consider saving the life of a homeless animal!

Visit the shelter and take home a new best friend!

Mustang Animal Shelter

Make a difference – adopt a shelter animal!

All of these pictures were taken Thursday, November 11th, by Madalyn Llewellyn

The shelter is open to the public: Mon. Tues. Thurs. Fri.
9:00am – 12:00pm & 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Wed.  9:00am – 12:00pm
Closed on Saturday and Sunday.

All adoptions are made through

Friends of the Mustang Animal Shelter (FOMAS)

Dog adoptions are $100   Cat adoptions are $75

All animals are dewormed, vaccinated, microchipped and spayed or neutered

520 West SW 59th Street, Mustang, OK 73064 

Police Dept Dispatch (405) 376-2488

This Week’s Wednesday’s Children are available through the Friends of the Mustang Animal Shelter.   There are some beautiful dogs and cats for adoption so please go rescue one today! Rescued pets make the best companions!!!  A big “THANKS” is owed to Madalyn Llewellyn for doing what she does every week!

 

Vaccinations

posted November 8th, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Vaccinations

VaccinationsVaccinations for children are certainly a controversy.  Trust me, there’s an equal controversy about the reality of vaccinations for dogs.  Every week we see the results of those who do not believe in vaccinations for their dogs – and the dogs have heart worms or ehrlichia.  For the most part, dog owners, get it with rabies vaccinations – in large part due to municipal ordinances and the actual reality that humans are at risk if bitten by a rabid animal.

Every year many people get the flu shot – especially if they didn’t one year and caught the flu.  Well, in dogs ehrlichia can make a dog feel as though it has the flu.  If you don’t want to feel lousy – then care enough to get you dog the monthly medication  so they do not test positive for ehrlichia.

Now – the big challenge.  Heartworms.  True confession, I grew up in rural Wyoming – it freezes every winter and all the mosquitos die.  Heartworm is not the problem it is in this area.  They’re preventable with one tablet per month – the treatment if they have heartworm is expensive and the dog must be kept quiet.  What’s so sad for too many municipal shelters is the raw fact that they do not have the funds to treat heartworm.  You know the rest of the story.

And then there’s fleas – – lots and lots of fleas.  Yes, they itch – and when they’re bad enough they cause hair loss.  Dorothy (pictured below) is a visual example of a sweet little Chihuahua who was covered (yes covered)  in fleas so badly her hair had fallen out.  The second picture is Dorothy in her pink Sunday outfit – designed to keep her warm until her hair grows back.  I can only imagine how awful she felt before treatment.  Fleas itch – – they really, really do. You can prevent fleas on your dogs and cats and in your home by treating the animals on a monthly basis.  Simple, effective and guaranteed to give your animals and you an itchy/scratchy free life.

Vaccinate, Immunize, get the shots – it’s a simple solution

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

Do the Math

posted October 30th, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Do the Math

Do the Math.  It’s true – there’s an Oklahoma Standard when it comes to helping in time of great need.  I witnessed it first hand following the Murrah Bombing and one of the devastating Moore tornadoes.  Recently, that Oklahoma ability to come together during a tragedy happened on the campus of Oklahoma State University.

If only that standard could be a part of the world of rescue.

We opened our doors in late April.  It quickly became apparent we would need to transport out-of-state if we wanted to save some of the homeless dogs that came into our facility.  It felt wonderful to quickly find organizations in Colorado and Wyoming that needed our dogs.  However, this great feeling of accomplishment only lasted for a few days.  Then we do the math and reality hits us and we’re once again looking for organizations out-of-state to help us.

What we are really saying is:  We don’t have an Oklahoma Standard when it comes to saving the lives of homeless dogs and cats.  We’re just sending our problems to someone else.  I know, for a fact, that Colorado is beginning to take notice and I won’t be surprised if they enact some changes.

Here’s the math for three months – – from three rescues.  A total of 584 – – YES – – 584 dogs were transported out-of-state.  Look at an Oklahoma map – – the Vinita/ surrounding area can be multiplied by at least 5 (or more) and when you do the math you begin to realize in all probability more than 2,500 dogs found new homes out-of-state.

We can set the Oklahoma standard.  Support spay/neuter clinics, be sure your pets are “fixed” or look in the mirror and understand that as the weather turns cold, the roads become treacherous, all of us will send fewer dogs out-of-state.  However, that doesn’t mean fewer dogs needs homes – it just means more dogs will die.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

Connection

posted October 23rd, 2015 by
Holiday Gift

Connection

There is documented evidence of the connection between domestic, elder, animal and child abuse.  Sadly, they are all too prevalent in our society.  All you have to do is ask anyone who works in rescue, child welfare, law enforcement, education or religion.

 

For all the negative aspects, there is hope of breaking the cycle of violence through intervention.  One proven, winning, solution has been the interaction between animals, especially dogs, with those have a history of being the recipients of abuse – or were the abuser themselves.

 

My first encounter with the latter was the dog training program at Lexington Prison.  Thanks to a documentary underwritten by the Kirkpatrick Foundation, The Dogs of Lexington, tells the redemptive story of shelter dogs, prisoners, and people.  Sarge was a growly, grumpy, nippy schnauzer mix, deemed unadoptable.  Today Sarge is the resident therapy dog for the Norman, Oklahoma Veterans Center.  I personally watched the magic happen.

 

Last school year, I spent one day with middle school students in rural Oklahoma.  It was disheartening to realize how many of their lives were chaotic, except in the classroom.  The value of therapy dogs in schools, like this one, would pay rich rewards as the students transition through high school and then try to find their place in society.

 

What I have learned is that doing nothing – – solves nothing.  The abuse continues, more lives are affected and the cycle grows and grows and grows.  It has to stop somewhere – it can stop with you, the person reading this article.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

Pet Travel Guide

posted October 23rd, 2015 by
Pet Travel

PET TRAVEL GUIDE

Pet Travel is becoming more and more popular. Bringing your pet on holidays with you adds to the fun of your trip and alleviates the worry of not knowing what’s happening with them while you’re away. Before travelling, you need to do your homework. Planes and cars aren’t designed with animals in mind. You also need to know what to expect when you do reach your final destination. There are a lot of rules and restrictions in place from country to country. By planning your pet travel ahead of time, you can make your hard earned holiday a truly relaxing time for everyone involved. To help you and your jet-setting animal companions, Greyhounds As Pets have produced an infographic that shows you the most important things you need to know about taking them on holidays with you. The Website URL is http://www.gapnsw.com.au/dogs-for-apartments/

Tom Clarke
Marketing Manager

greyhounds as pets
Building B| 1 Homebush Bay Drive Rhodes NSW 2138
t : 02 87 67 0535 | f : 02 97 64 6244
Website: www.gapnsw.com.au

Pet Travel

Lost and Found in OKC

posted October 21st, 2015 by
Organic Squeeze

Lost and Found in OKC

Pet Lost and Found can be a harrowing experience

These guidelines are thanks to OKC Animal Welfare

Lost Pet:

Not being able to find your pet is an especially traumatic experience. Here are some helpful tips that will increase your chances of finding him or her.

 

Visit our Shelter Daily:

OKCAW takes in lost pets and stray animals every day at our shelter located at 2811 SE 29th steeet. Lost pets and stray animals are held for three days if they have no identification and five days if they are identified in order to provide you with enough time to visit the shelter and find your pet. If no one claims the animal during the holding time, the animal is evaluated for placement options. When you arrive at the shelter to look for your pet, go to the front counter and tell the staff member that you are looking for a lost pet. Bring in ID for yourself as well as for your animal. You will fill out a short form and a staff member will escort you through the building. While you’re at the shelter, take the time to look at every cage; this will eliminate the possibility of you passing a cage that your pet may be in. We recommend that you visit at least every two days.

 

Ask the front desk for a blue “lost card”.  Make sure to fill this out completely and in detail, and it will be posted on our lost and found board.

 

Search our Website’s Found Pets Database:

Pictures and/or descriptions of animals that have been brought to our Care Centers are posted on our website hourly. To search the database of found animals in our care:

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select Search for Pet
  • Animal Type: select which animal you are searching for
  • Animal Gender: select No Preference
  • Animal Age: Select No Preference
  • Animal Size: Select No Preference

 

The last page shows the most recent animals we have received.  Please start on the last page and work your way back to the beginning.  If you find an animal that resembles yours please write down the animal ID so that one of our representatives can point you in the right direction once you arrive at the shelter.

If you see an animal that fits the description of your lost pet, visit the shelter to reclaim your pet. Please make sure you come in with the animal identification number from the website and pictures of your animals for identification purposes.

 

File a Lost Pet Report Online:

A report filed with OKCAW will be entered into an online database that searches our computer records and will send you information if there is a match. This report will be valid for 30 days and will continue to send you information if applicable during those 30 days.

When filing the Lost Pet report, please remember to upload a photo of your lost pet (a clear full body photo, if possible). Also, please leave the top check-off box unchecked so to allow a copy of your report to be sent to OKCAW. If you check this box, our Lost and Found will not be able to reach you if a match is made.

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select I Lost a Pet
  • Click the appropriate link for dog or cat
  • Fill out the report with as much detail as possible
  • Attach a photo of your pet
  • Click the “Submit Request” button

 

Found Pets:

Thank you for taking care of the lost pet you have found. Below is a list of options to assist you in locating the family of the lost pet.

If the animal has identification, contact the owner. Identification comes in many forms, so please check the animal thoroughly for a tag, tattoo or microchip. You can bring an animal to most shelters and veterinary hospitals to scan the animal for a microchip. Some owners write their phone number on their pet’s collar. If the animal has an OKCAW rabies tag, call 405-297-3100 during normal business hours or send us an email to [email protected] and we will return your message as soon as possible.

 

Bring to the Pet to OKCAW:

If the animal was found in Oklahoma City, you may bring it to the shelter. OKCAW takes in lost pets and stray animals every day from 9am-5:45pm at our shelter located at 2811 SE 29th St in Oklahoma City. Lost pets are put on hold for three days if they have no identification or five days if there is identification in order to provide the owners with enough time to locate their pets. After three or five days, the animal gets evaluated and made available for placement. Note: If you are a finder of a lost pet and are interested in adopting the pet after the hold period, please be at the facility by noon on the day the hold period is up to adopt. All adoption criteria apply.

Please note that all animals that come into our care are scanned for a microchip. If the animal has a current chip or other form of identification, we make every attempt to contact the owner to reunite them with their pet.

 

Keep the Pet at Your Home:

If you want to keep the animal during the hold period, please come to the shelter to fill out a green “found card” (ask the front desk for one).  We will post this form on our lost and found board in the building. Also, file a found report on our website.

File a Found Pet Report Online:

A report filed with OKCAW will be entered into an online database that searches our computer records and will send you information if there is a match. This report will be valid for 30 days and will continue to send you information if applicable during those 30 days.

When filing the Found Pet report, please remember to upload a photo of the found pet (a clear full body photo, if possible). Also, please leave the top check-off box unchecked so to allow a copy of your report to be sent to OKCAW. If you check this box, our Lost and Found will not be able to reach you if a match is made.

  • Go to http://www.okc.gov/animalwelfare
  • On the left hand side select I Found a Pet
  • Click the appropriate link for dog or cat
  • Fill out the report with as much detail as possible
  • Attach a photo of your pet
  • Click the “Submit Request” button

 

Other Tips on Locating the Owners of a Found Pet:

Post flyers within a 2-mile radius of where you found the pet. Your flyer should include a detailed description of the animal, pictures and your contact information. Post this flyer with permission in as many places around the neighborhood as possible: pet shops, veterinarian and doctors offices, supermarkets, police precincts, bulletin boards, bus stops, taxi services, laundromats, delivery people, schools, etc. If someone responds to your flyer, make sure you see proof of ownership prior to releasing the pet to the person. Pictures work best. Do not forget to remove all flyers once the pet is reunited with his or her owner.

Place an ad in local and state newspapers, as well as in online publications. Most newspapers do this free of charge. You may also create a Twitter account and/or Facebook Page.