Author Archives: Steve

Success – Redefined

posted February 14th, 2016 by
Holiday Gift

Success – Redefined

 

SuccessThe Peaceful Animal Adoption Shelter opened in late April of 2015.  At that time the goal was to find new homes in northeastern Oklahoma for the dogs and cats who would come through our doors.  Six weeks later we realized we needed to redefine our mission.

 

In August we made our first transport to the Cheyenne Animal Shelter in Wyoming. This was quickly followed by transports to Boulder Valley Humane Society and Denver Dumb Friends League.  As of today, 340+ dogs and 85+ cats have found their forever homes – – almost exclusively out-of-state.  The hand writing is on the wall – we save lives via transport.

 

Sooo, when you read this (and share it with your friends), by all means do look at our web and facebook pages to see if we have available dogs and cats.  Don’t be surprised if we only have a few – if any.  However, do visit your local shelters and rescues.  In our area, they include:  Miami Animal Alliance, Second Chance Pet Rescue of Grand Lake and Pryor Animal League.  I know there are others – – the point is one of us will have the pet you are looking for – – please give all of us in rescue a chance.

 

As the Executive Director at PAAS, it is exciting and rewarding to now reach out to area municipal pounds and rescues.  Working with them, we will make a significant impact on the homeless dogs and cats in northeastern Oklahoma.  States with good (and enforced) spay/neuter laws will welcome our dogs and cats.  It’s a win for PAAS, a win for the area and a home run for the families in Colorado and Wyoming who want, need, and adopt.

 

Yes, we’ve redefined success – and it took less than one year!!!!!!

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

 

OKC Animal Welfare

posted February 13th, 2016 by
OKC Animal Welfare

OKC Animal Welfare Shelter

OKC Pets Magazine toured the OKC Animal Welfare Shelter and took these pictures of adorable animals available for adoption. If you are thinking about a new family member, please consider saving the life of a homeless animal!

Visit the shelter and take home a new best friend!

OKC Animal Welfare

Make a difference – adopt a shelter animal!

All of these pictures were taken February 12th, by Madalyn Llewellyn

The shelter is open for adopting or reclaiming pets from noon to 5:45 p.m. every day except holidays

(The OKC Animal Welfare Shelter opens at 2:00 pm every third Wednesday of the month)

See us on Facebook

More Information about the OKC Animal Welfare Shelter

Our Wish list

Lost and Found in OKC

Dog & Cat adoptions are $60

2811 SE 29th St.  Oklahoma City, OK  73129

(405) 297-3100

A special reduced rate of $30 will be charged to adopt animals that meet any of the following criteria:

  • eligible for adoption more than 14 days

  • two or more pets adopted together ($30 each)

  • pets four years of age or older

  • pets with serious medical conditions, such as untreated heartworm, pets in need of major surgery or medical care expected to cost $100 or more, or feline leukemia-positive cats

  • pets needing medical care expected to cost $100 or more

  • pets adopted during special promotional events

  • pets neutered by private veterinarians at the adopter’s expense

Spay and neuter your pets for FREE!

Community Spay Neuter Program

Oklahoma City Animal Welfare sponsors the Community Spay Neuter Program.

We provide FREE spay and neuter for cats and dogs of Oklahoma City residents.

Leave us a message to schedule your appointment!

405.297.3100

[email protected]

Support this program by donating at www.okc.gov/animalwelfare

*Your pet must pass a pre-surgery health exam

This Week’s Wednesday’s Children are available through the OKC Animal Welfare Shelter.   There are some beautiful dogs and cats for adoption so please go rescue one today! Rescued pets make the best companions!!!  A big “THANKS” is owed to Madalyn Llewellyn for doing what she does every week!

A Time for Reflection

posted January 31st, 2016 by
Coconut Oil

A Time for Reflection

By Pat Becker

Every once in a while someone asks me how and why I became an animal enthusiast, a pet advocate, a dog lover. After all, I have hosted a national PBS TV series, “The World of Dogs Biography Series,” a local radio show on KTOK, “Speak,” and a local TV show on KSBI, “Dog Talk.” So when I’m interviewed, it’s often the first question asked of me.
I’ve given it some thought. It occurred to me I was exposed to the charms of animals at an early age. I can only assume it was through my parents’ compassion for—and access to—puppies and kittens raised by my grandmother. Both my sisters and I learned the value of having furry, loving companions with whom we shared our secrets, our joys and our sorrows. To hold a tiny kitten, to be aware of its vulnerability and feel the obligation for its care taught us dependability.
We also took pride in having trained our dogs by gaining their trust. My family and I have long been involved in obedience trials. As a result, the tradition has been passed down to my daughters. I began showing my Cocker Spaniel in conformation classes at a young age. I trained my Beagle in agility and freestyle and my Canaan dog in barn hunting. Likewise, my daughter Lorri achieved a CDX title on her Old English Sheepdog and had the first Rat Terrier in the U.S. to win a Master award in Fly Ball. And we’ve hunted quail with seven fabulous Pointers for years.
Out of my love of animals I have developed close relationships with the best and brightest professionals in the country, having had the opportunity of highlighting their skills with dogs on my radio and television shows. I never tire of learning new information about dog training, medical updates for animals and the all-important psychology of evolution among our animals. Passing on exciting, educational data is my mission.
My experience as an actress with 20th Century Fox in the 60s, and as a singer with The William Morris Agency, gave me the confidence to feel comfortable in the area of communication as a media professional, allowing me to further the cause of loving and caring for our animal friends.
Through the years, most of my dogs have been adoptees. God blessed me with 46 furry companions in my lifetime. Some were purebreds; some were crossbreeds. Frankly, I saw more in them than their DNA and defined them by their good character, not a breed.
After all, I’ve never met a dog who could not be trained. However, I’ve met countless numbers of people who had a great deal of trouble communicating with their dogs and other people, a fact which might account for their lack of training skills.
When any of us in the business of dog advocacy are asked the question, “What in your opinion is the most important advice you can give to someone who has recently adopted a dog?” our answer is unanimous: learn to “speak dog!” You can’t understand a dog if you don’t have the ability to communicate with him.
We can truly learn to “talk” with our dogs. Dogs study our physical movement and the energy level of our vocal activity. Then they interpret and respond to our interactions with them. Trying to understand us and how to please us are necessary efforts which ensure our dogs’ survival. Sadly, many people are often inconsistent in their physical and emotional behavior, and it makes the dogs’ job harder.
Also, we can learn to read our dogs’ body language. From the tip of their ears to the tip of their tails, their bodies speak to us. Make it a point to study your dog’s active and reactive movements. It will make your lives together so much easier! Remember every time you interact with your dog you’re teaching him something about you, himself and the world around him. Make it something good!

Many hugs!

OKC Pets Mag Jan / Feb 2016

posted January 14th, 2016 by
OKC Pets

OKC Pets Magazine  January/February 2016

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick, Nancy Harrison, Cheryl Steckler, Nicole Castillo

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Pat Becker, Nicole Castillo, Kaycee Chance, Anna Holton-Dean, Nancy Gallimore, Camille Hulen, Emily Perry, Jordan Southerland, Kirstee Starr Carter

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2015 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

OKC Pets Magazine provides Oklahoma City area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now OKC Pets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

Dog Powered Scooter

posted January 11th, 2016 by
Dog Powered

Dog Powered Scooter!

We are different here and unsatisfied with the traditional way we road work and mush our dogs. We want more safety, steering control over the dog and better dog control. We want the system to be user friendly, thus easy and quick to hook up the dog/dogs, we are not interested in lots of dog training, and we want to use the system right from our homes and not have to drive out of town. And we wanted a system that most everyone can use. We’ve achieved these goals and more- dog powered mobility has become a practical reality.

Appropriate dogs for these systems are

- Young or middle-aged dogs

- At least 35 lbs. for single dogs and at least 18 lbs. each for multiple dogs

- High Drive. Athletic, Runners, Pullers, NOT RECOMMENDED FOR SPOOKY DOGS

- Reactive or even aggressive since the dog control is excellent but they can also run!

- Dogs that cannot be let off leash

- Blind and or Deaf Dogs- finally they can go full blast!

 Dog Powered

Over 2000 sold since I started back in 2005, with no injuries to dog or rider reported!

Caution: Urban dog mushing is a serious sport where safety for dog and rider is the first priority.   When starting out with a new dog, it is recommended you wear a helmet, gloves, and sturdy shoes.

Some dogs are spooked by the side to side restriction but most will “get it” in 1-3 sessions. AND you can prepare your dog early by hooking them up to things (like a kids wagon, an old tire, a concrete block or even a gallon jug of water), and under your supervision, pull that around the yard.

Considerations: Rider/dog weight ratio, outdoor temperature, water availability and extent of time on hard surface, are just some of the factors to consider. See our Safety Page for more details.

Only conscientious and caring dog owners need apply.

 

These rigs are NOT the only way to exercise your dog/dogs, just one great way and part of the mix.

This product deserves to have a worldwide distribution –  its more than urban mushing.

See contact info. below.

DogPoweredScooter.com

60285 Cinder Butte Rd., Bend, Oregon 97702

541-633-0680

[email protected]

Dumped to Die

posted January 11th, 2016 by
Holiday Gift

Dumped to die is something that no one who loves animals will ever understand!  How can people can drive to a deserted place and put a box of puppies on the side of the road …then drive away.  Or leave them next to a mailbox……by the railroad tracks……or in a dumpster.  For those who are in rescue, it causes high blood pressure, insomnia and anger management issues to name a few.

It may not be an epidemic in rural, northeastern, Oklahoma, but it sure feels and looks like it is.  How someone can look at themselves in the mirror, face their family and live with the memory that they sentenced innocent puppies to death – – – puppies who had no voice – – who were born because oh dear lord we can’t spay our momma dog and we sure aren’t going to neuter our male.  SERIOUSLY!!!!  Then you take care of the offspring, raise them yourself and provide for them.  But do not dump them!!!!

There is an organization,  The Link Coalition, which tracks animal, child and spousal abuse.  There is a connection between the three.  Oklahoma has a high percentage of child abuse and spousal abuse per capita ratios.  If we tracked dumped, abandoned dogs we would be shocked.

The answer – is spay/neuter.  If you have a litter of puppies that need a home and you’re not willing to get the mother dog fixed, I have no words to describe how angry/sad that makes all of us who, every day, look into the eyes of scared, homeless dogs and work tirelessly to find them new homes.

I’ve said it before – I’ll say it again.  Oklahomans make a difference!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kay Stout, Director 

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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