Author Archives: Steve

Dog Smells

posted November 13th, 2016 by
Dog Smells

5 Tips for Getting Rid of Dog Smells

without Expensive Products

5 Tips for Getting Rid of Dog Smells without Expensive Products There are plenty of great things about owning a dog. Companionship, exercise and love toThere are plenty of great things about owning a dog. Companionship, exercise and love to name a few. But one of the downsides is that “doggy” smell that seems to be impossible to remove.

Considering the benefits of owning a dog, most owners are happy to just accept the smell as part of the deal. Dogs don’t hold themselves to the same hygiene standards as humans, so it’s not a surprise they smell a bit! But the good news is that a dog smell doesn’t need to be an unavoidable side-effect of owning a dog, as we’ll see in this article.

What Causes the Dog Smell?

All animals have a natural smell, but the dog version seems to be particularly strong and distinctive. This is mainly because dogs are larger than other indoor domestic animals, which is why cat owners don’t have a similar problem.

The doggy smell is often caused by paw sweat which is carried around the home. The continuous build-up of sweat and bacteria leads to sofas and other furniture starting to smell.

Smells may also be caused by unconscious scent-marking. Don’t worry – this doesn’t involve urinating on the carpet! Dogs naturally produce a smell to mark their territory, and this is often the main culprit when it comes to a lingering smell in your home. Other causes for a dog smell include skin oil, which is why dogs with oily skin often smell more strongly, and ear wax.

In many cases, the smell is simply because your pet is dirty. Dirt provides the perfect environment for odor-releasing bacteria (just like humans).

Tip #1 – Freshen Up Your Upholstery

Furniture is one of the most commonly overlooked sources of a dog smell. Most people don’t vacuum upholstery as often as carpets, which is why the fabric can harbor odors – especially if your pet loves to sleep on the sofa.

 The first step is to remove and wash any covers that can be machine washed. Use a high heat (check the label first though) to quickly get rid of odor-releasing particles.

For parts of the sofa that can’t be machine washed, baking soda can be useful for getting rid of smells. Just sprinkle it over areas you think are particularly smelly and leave for 2-3 hours, before vacuuming up the powder.

Tip #2 – Wash (And Dry) Your Dog More Regularly

The cleaner your dog, the less he is going to smell. When giving your pet a bath, make sure you check the feet and fur for anything he might have stepped or rolled in. Then use a dog shampoo (don’t use regular shampoo) on his entire body.

Once washed, it’s also important to dry your dog thoroughly. Dog hair is a perfect location for bacteria, which also thrives on moist conditions. This is why “wet dog” is such a distinctive smell!

Unfortunately, most dogs hate having baths. You can often make the process more fun for them by providing the occasional treat throughout the process.

Tip #3 – Get Rid of Carpet Smells

Carpets, wood floors and even vinyl can start to smell if not cleaned regularly. In fact, flooring is probably the most common cause of a dog smell that never seems to go away. This is because your dog’s feet picks up all sorts of bacteria on walks, which are then carried into the home.

For this reason, hard floors should be regularly cleaned with an anti-bacterial floor cleaner that’s suitable for the type of material. The goal isn’t to make the floor look clean, although this is a bonus, but to kill bacteria living on the floor.

You can also use the baking soda trick on carpets to clean areas that smell noticeably bad. Sprinkle the powder on the worst areas and leave it overnight.

Note: if your carpets are heavily soiled, you may need to hire a professional carpet cleaner. This can be expensive, but provides a much cleaner starting point to maintain a smell-free home.

Tip #4 – Vacuum Three Times Each Week

Dog hair isn’t the only thing that drops off your pet. Skin particles, bacteria and dirt are all released from your dog – especially when he shakes after a walk.

That’s why it’s a good idea to vacuum at least three times per week. This sounds like a lot, but you’ll be amazed at how much dirt and hair a vacuum with strong suction will remove from your home even when cleaning regularly.

If you own a steam cleaner, the high pressure output can kill bacteria in carpets and on hard floors. Some steam cleaners also come with an upholstery tool, which can be useful for removing stubborn odors from sofas and other furniture.

Tip #5 – Brush Your Pooch’s Teeth

Finally, bad dog breath is another common source of unwanted odors. The best way to solve this is to regularly clean your dog’s teeth.

Admittedly, many dogs hate having their teeth cleaned. If your pet won’t let you clean his teeth, you can try treats that clean while the dog chews them. These aren’t as effective as a proper toothbrush though.

Summary

An unpleasant smell doesn’t need to be an unavoidable consequence of owning a dog. By following the tips in this post, you can get rid of the dog smell and make your home smell fresh and inviting.

While it’s a good idea to follow all the tips in this post, the most important is keeping your upholstery and carpets as clean as possible. These are reservoirs of bacteria that cause your home to smell, so cleaning them can have a big effect on odors.

- Andrew Webster

OKC Pets Mag Nov / Dec 2016

posted November 9th, 2016 by
OKC Pets

OKC Pets Magazine  Sept / Oct 2016

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick, Nancy Harrison, Cheryl Steckler

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Pat Becker, Derinda Blakeney, Nicole Castillo, Kaycee Chance, Anna Holton-Dean, Nancy Gallimore, Tracei Holder, DVM, Emily Perry, Farah Payton-Snider, Dolores Proubasta, Jordan Southerland, Kirstie Starr-Carter

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2016 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

OKC Pets Magazine provides Oklahoma City area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now OKC Pets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

Pets and Kids

posted October 16th, 2016 by
Grooming

Pets and Kids

Pets and kids can be an amazing combination.  They can also be a disastrous combination when safety measures aren’t taken.  Here are some tips to ensure your kids and pets are the perfect pair:

~Teach your children from an early age not to pull on the ears or tails of animals.  They should also never pinch or squeeze them, or make loud noises.  Teach them to never disturb a dog while it is sleeping, eating or playing with its favorite toy.  

~Teach your child to never approach strange dogs or animals.  Always ask the owner if they can pet the animal first. 

~Never allow your child to reach through a fence to pet a dog or to tease a dog through a fence. 

~Don’t allow pets to lick your child’s face and do your best to keep animals out of a child’s face all together.

~Teach your child to be polite and kind to animals.  Don’t let them do anything to an animal you wouldn’t allow them to do to another child. 

Teaching your child to respect animals allows them the opportunity to have some amazing experiences and possibly even develop a best friend for life! 

 

Promises Made

posted October 9th, 2016 by
Making a Distinction

Promises Made

PromisesPeople live longer and so do their pets.  Unfortunately, too often the pet outlives the owner and someone is left with a problem that has many options for a solution – only most of them are not realistic.

Families are frequently scattered hundreds of miles apart, have busy lives and do not feel they can take care of an elderly cat or dog that was the beloved pet of one of their parents or relatives.  When that is the case, it really helps all of us in rescue if a sibling or relative will make the necessary decisions regarding the pet’s future. Sadly, too often, that isn’t the case and it is left to a friend or neighbor.

There are no easy answers. But here are some facts that need to be considered.  Elderly dogs and cats are very difficult, if not impossible, to rehome.  Rescues are hard-pressed to find a good home for the puppies/kittens and young dogs/cats. When you call us and we listen, then explain why we can’t take the pet – it tears at our hearts.  But we also know, we have to be sure we save as many homeless dogs and cats as possible and the stark reality then means we can’t save all of them.

I can speak for PAAS and the 15+ rescues who now work with us – – we are saving 100+ dogs each month that are transferred to our partner in Colorado.  That keeps us going because we can see the positive impact it has.  We also know we can’t lose sight of that progress when faced with a phone call or conversation with someone who’s promised a friend/relative they would take care of their elderly pet, then realize it isn’t possible.

Social media can sometimes come to the rescue – especially Facebook sites.  But there’s no guarantee.  Plans and decisions should be made ahead of time – – for everyone involved.

Remember your pets have no voice – – you – – only you  – – are their voice.

Kay Stout, Director 

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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Fall Tips for Animal Safety

posted October 6th, 2016 by
Grooming

Fall Tips for Animal Safety

1. Beware of ticks! Just because the weather is getting cool doesn’t mean the ticks are gone. In fact, several species of ticks can survive until the first frost. Keep up your flea/tick prevention to help keep your pets safe from ticks and the diseases they carry with them.
2. The incidents of poison increase during the fall and winter months. We are already seeing cases of rat poisoning this year! If you have pets, rodenticides are just not worth the risk. Seek out other solutions to rid your home of rodents.
Anit-freeze is another poison concern. Propylene glycol is used to make both anti-freeze and used to preserve moisture content in some dog foods. It is sweet tasting, leading both dogs and cats to lick the anti-freeze causing them to become ill. Check your vehicles for leaks and keep all anti-freeze secure and out of your pet’s reach.
3. Make your holiday reservations now! As the holidays approach, we get busier and busier. Get your reservations in now with your pet sitters and boarding facilities to make things easier.
4. Be careful with holiday treats! We know the hazards of chocolate but many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets. Here is a quick list of foods to avoid giving to your pet:
Alcoholic beverages
Apple seeds
Apricot pits
Avocados
Cherry pits
Candy (particularly chocolate—which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets—and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Coffee (grounds, beans, and chocolate-covered espresso beans)
Garlic
Grapes
Gum (can cause blockages and sugar free gums may contain the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Hops (used in home beer brewing)
Macadamia nuts
Moldy foods
Mushroom plants
Mustard seeds
Onions and onion powder
Peach pits
Potato leaves and stems (green parts)
Raisins
Rhubarb leaves
Salt
Tea (because it contains caffeine)
Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)
Walnuts
Xylitol (artificial sweetener that is toxic to pets)
Yeast dough

Cat Health

posted September 26th, 2016 by
Grooming

Cat Health

At the Animal Emergency Center we see a lot of sick cats. One of the number-one ways to keep your cat healthy and avoid a trip to see us is to keep your cat indoors. Here are the top reasons to keep your cats indoors.

*You can monitor your cat’s urinary tract/bowels. We commonly see male cats with blocked urinary tracts at the ER. If not treated quickly, this condition can be fatal. Monitoring is key to catching problems early and seeking treatment.

*Indoor cats are much safer from diseases. Coming in contact with outdoor cats increases the risk of contracting diseases such as

FeLV (Feline Leukemia)
FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis)
Panleukopenia(Feline Distemper)
FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus)
Zoonotic Diseases

*Indoor cats do not get hit by cars. Each year more cats are killed by cars than euthanized in US animal shelters. Cats are quick and even the most careful driver has a hard time avoiding a cat running across the street.

*Indoor cats are safe from stray dogs and wildlife. Cats are low on the food chain and are prey for most wild animals and dogs. Keeping them indoors will prevent them from being attacked.

*Indoor cats don’t get lost. Statistics show only 3% of owned cats are returned to owners when they end up at a shelter. Even microchips aren’t a guarantee. Why take the risk?

*Indoor cats are safe from human abuse. Some people find outdoor cats a nuisance and will use poisons and other means to get rid of them.