Animal Advocacy

Faith’s Story

posted May 20th, 2018 by
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Hi.  My name is Faith and I really didn’t know what it meant to be loved until PAAS rescued me and I got to go to the Richardson Birthing and Rehabilitation Center.  At first, I was scared so I went to the laundry room and just looked at the back door.  I even slept there.  Then I realized that all the other dogs living in this wonderful place were having fun in the rest of the house.

They tell me that after a week, I finally started to play with the others and even spent some nights sleeping on a bed made especially for me in their bedroom.

Faith

Faith before and after

 I had terrible itchy skin and big sores all over me. The nice people here started giving me these wonderful baths every other day for weeks.  It felt so good, so did all the pets and loving I got. I had big scars on my side from when I had my 4 litters of babies.  They had left some stitches in and those got taken out. They gave me special food to help me gain my weight back, I was really feeling good. They said I was in a foster home. Those are great places to go to, and I loved my foster parents and gave them lots of sloppy kisses. I even learned to sit, lie down, roll over and walk on a leash like a lady and best of all to trust humans again.

Next I remember going on this long, long ride with lots of other dogs.  We stopped, in the middle of the night, so all of us could stretch our legs, water and fertilize a dog park.  Then we loaded back up and headed to Colorado.

Here’s my update – I’ve left the building (Dumb Friends League) in Colorado for my forever home.  Patti wrote this so I know it’s correct:  I got adopted by a woman with a French bulldog who has obviously been very well cared for.  I got along with her and my new Mom.  So…keep the Faith – – – I did – – and I’m home!!!!

Save Lives 90% Live Release Rate by 2025

posted May 12th, 2018 by
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Save Lives 90% Live Release Rate by 2025

Best Friends Animal Society has set a goal for Oklahoma to have a 90% live release rate for dogs and cats in shelters by 2025.  Based on what PAAS and our transport partners have accomplished the past two years, it no longer seems to be an impossible goal to reach.  Certainly, what I learned at the Collective Impact Convening Conference validated this is an attainable goal.

In the coming weeks, I will try to not sound like a broken record about spay/neuter and transport successes.  No guarantees – – just fair warning.  J  J  J.

Here’s the first installment.  Rhonda, Lacee and I attended the SAVELIVES.UNITEOKLAHOMA conference Monday, April 30th in Oklahoma City. It was sponsored by The Kirkpatrick Foundation and Best Friends Animal Society   They experienced the same “aha” moments I did while I was in Austin.  On Tuesday afternoon, we had a recap of the conference and it was fascinating to hear the excitement in their voices, the animation in their stories and the profound belief that we can have a 90% Live Release Rate by 2025 in rural Oklahoma.

Save Lives

It was especially rewarding to see all the teal blue PAAS Ride to Rescue t-shirts sprinkled throughout the conference room with the PAAS logo.  I’m writing this on a Tuesday evening, and tonight 31 dogs will head to Colorado – arriving at Dumb Friends League tomorrow morning.  Those that are “fixed” will soon have new homes, the other will join them after a brief stop in the operating room and a recovery period.

At the HSUS conference in May PAAS Pets for Life will be recognized for exceeding the goal of 400 spay/neuters in the first year of the program!!!!  We’re getting there.

Kay

 

Kay Stout, Director

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

http://www.paasvinita.com

Making Connections

posted February 24th, 2018 by
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Making Connections

Making Connections

Usually the blog is about animal rescue.  This week it’s about making connections.  It’s how PAAS came to have a partnership with Dumb Friends League in Colorado.

ConnectionsA long time ago, I attended The Pacific Institute (www.thepacificinstitute.com).  By the time I left Seattle Washington, I realized the power of thinking outside the box, visualizing results and reaching out to connect with people.

Since then, connections have opened doors, given me opportunities and provided solutions I could have never discovered on my own.  One of the most important aspects of making a connection is to just let your mind wander as you’re trying to solve a problem with the goal of “who do I know?”

All my friends know how I got an airline to send a plane to Miami to fly a soccer team to Brazil.  It was before the days of cell phones, internet connections, websites and Facebook/LinkedIn.

Today, sitting in front of a computer with a good cup of coffee, I can reach out to people all over the world.  And almost all of the time, I can refer to someone we mutually know or someone who belongs to the same Facebook or LinkedIn group.

In 2015, PAAS had a shelter full of dogs and cats, a long, long, long waiting list of owner surrenders and only a handful of potential adopters coming through the door each week.  Rhonda (veterinary technician) and I looked at each other and realized we needed a Plan B.  Fortunately, I’d just attended the Kirkpatrick Foundation’s Conference (https://safeandhumaneoklahoma.org) and made a connection.

I called him – he referred me to Bob at Dumb Friends League – and Bob said “yes” we could transport dogs to his organization on a trial basis.  The first few months were challenging, sometimes chaotic, emotionally draining and successful.  Over time we’ve established protocols that meet their standards, saved more homeless dogs and cats than we could have ever imagined and work directly with 14 other shelters/rescues.  What’s really mind-blowing is they, in turn, work with more than 30 rural rescues/shelters.

The connection started with me attending a conference and selecting the break-out session where Roger was presenting.

Intersection – Oklahoma Link Coalition Conference

posted October 25th, 2017 by
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Intersection

Oklahoma City Conference on November 7

Will Address the Link Between Animal and Human Abuse

Dear Friends,

On Tuesday, November 7, 2017, at the Oklahoma History Center, professionals from across Oklahoma will engage in a day-long discussion about the link between animal abuse and the cycle of family and societal violence. Called INTERSECTION, the conference is presented by the Oklahoma Link Coalition and Kirkpatrick Foundation; the event costs $15 and includes lunch. The conference will offer six CLEET hours (including two mental health), 6.5 CEUs for Oklahoma-licensed social workers, and 6.5 CEUs for Oklahoma-licensed veterinarians. We have capacity for 110 registrants and only twenty seats remain available. Check in begins at 9:30 a.m. with the first session at 10 a.m.; the day concludes at 4:15 p.m. A special announcement will take place at noon. If you are interested in attending the event, please follow this link and register now: http://www.oklahomalinkcoalition.org/events.html.

As you no doubt know, acts of animal cruelty are often the predictors and indicators of escalating violence against the human members of the family, with serious implications for society as well. Since its inception in June 2014, the Oklahoma Link Coalition’s mission has been to promote advocacy, cross-training, and networking across disparate fields and spreading awareness of “the Link” to as many professionals as possible, as well as to the public. INTERSECTION presenters include:

Randall Lockwood, PhD Senior VP for Forensic Sciences and Anti- Cruelty Projects, ASPCA

Melinda Merck, DVM leading forensic veterinarian

Dr. Mary Anne McCaffree, MD neonatologist and member of the National Health Collaborative on Violence and Abuse

Cynthia Armstrong, Oklahoma state director of the Humane Society of the Unites States

Diana Webster, president of the Native America Humane Society; Steve Kunzweiler, Tulsa County District Attorney; and Lt. Kimberly Teachman, Oklahoma City Police Department

Training on the AniCare Model of Treatment for Animal Abuse, the first professionally developed psychological intervention program for adults and children who have abused animals.

Intersection

Looking Back – Moving Forward

posted October 22nd, 2017 by
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Looking Back

Looking Back – Moving Forward

 

Two years ago PAAS had just begun to transport dogs (and a few cats) out-of-state.  It was a difficult time of transition.  PAAS had been conceived as a local rescue that would adopt dogs and cats locally.  The reality did not match the dream.

Looking BackIt wasn’t an easy transition for those who’d worked so hard and believed in the dream of PAAS as a local adoption center.  They cared enough to change their perception and help PAAS become a regional transport center, Pets for Life center for Vinita residents and a Pet Over-Population resource for those who live outside Vinita.  In addition, the inmate/shelter program at Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center is changing the lives of the inmates, their families and the dogs who graduate with a Canine Good Citizen certificate to go on to further training to be certified as a service/therapy dog.

Mixed amongst the progress are wonderful stories.  Here are a couple.

Looking BackRecently, a very scared, very pregnant Miss Bailey arrived at the shelter.  She was so terrified in the shelter, she would not walk on a leash, her tail was tucked and she shook.  Fast forward to our Birthing Center Angels at the Richardson/Rexwinkle Birthing Center.  Once she knew she was safe, she delivered 11 puppies – took wonderful care of them – and is now living the good life in Colorado.  Her puppies also went to Colorado and were adopted as soon as their pictures were up on the Dumb Friends League site.  We really celebrated when Miss Bailey also found her new home – who could resist those beautiful eyes.

And then there’s Copper.  He came to us from the Vinita pound.  Small, chunky guy – long in the tooth (older) – who liked a few and tolerated everyone else.  Fortunately, he decided Avis was going to be his new Mom.  Not sure Avis understood that at first – but it quickly became apparent wherever Avis went – here came Copper.  And, oh good lord, did he let all of us know when she went home at night – he was not a happy camper.  Yes you know the rest of this story – Avis saw the light and adopted Copper!!!!

Equally important is that of the 2,300+ dogs who’ve traveled to Dumb Friends League via the PAAS transport – not one of them will either a) have puppies or  b) be the father of a litter.  If you even try to do the math on how many puppies could have been born if the 2,300 dogs had not been “fixed” – it becomes very clear.

Kay Stout, Director 

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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Dr. Carlos Risco is new OSU Veterinary Dean

posted October 20th, 2017 by
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Carlos Risco

Oklahoma State names Dr. Carlos Risco Center for Veterinary Health Sciences dean

 

(STILLWATER, Okla., October 20, 2017) – The Oklahoma State University/A&M Board of Regents today approved the appointment of Dr. Carlos A. Risco as dean of the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. He is expected to assume his position in March.

Carlos RiscoRisco is currently at the University of Florida where he serves as a tenured professor and chair of the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences.

“I am excited for the opportunity to serve as dean,” Risco said. “The strong culture of scholarship, outstanding curriculum and the multidisciplinary approach to improve both animal and human health has led to the excellent reputation of the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.

“This reputation makes Oklahoma State a place where students want to attend,” Risco said. “As dean, I look forward to working with our talented faculty and staff to continue progress in the center’s role as a regional, national and international leader in veterinary medical education, research, and service.”

OSU Provost and Senior Vice President Gary Sandefur said, “We are pleased to have Dr. Risco join the OSU team. He will provide strong vision and leadership for our excellent veterinary program. I want to thank Vice President Thomas Coon and members of the search and screening committee for leading our national search and identifying an outstanding pool of candidates. I also appreciate Chris Ross and his solid leadership as interim dean.”

Risco received his DVM degree in 1980 from the University of Florida and advanced clinical training as an intern in private dairy practice at the Chino Valley Veterinary Associates in California. He is a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists.

From 1982 to 1990, he was a full partner at Chino Valley Veterinary Associates, a nine-veterinarian dairy practice. In 1990, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida as an assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Risco’s main research focus pertains to metabolic disorders and reproductive management of dairy cows.

 

CONTACT: Gary Shutt | OSU Communications | 405-744-4800 | [email protected]

Oklahoma State University is a modern land-grant university that prepares students for success. OSU has more than 36,000 students across its five-campus system and more than 25,000 on its combined Stillwater and Tulsa campuses, with students from all 50 states and around 120 nations. Established in 1890, Oklahoma State has graduated more than 260,000 students who have been serving Oklahoma and the world for 125 years. 

 

Derinda D. Blakeney, APR

Public Relations and Marketing Coordinator

Oklahoma State University

Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

308 McElroy Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078

(405) 744-6740 (office)

(405) 744-5233 (fax)

(405) 612-4019 (mobile)

[email protected]

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