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Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends

posted June 30th, 2016 by
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Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Nowadays, everyone is focusing on wellness, and caring for our furry friends is no exception.  I get asked almost every day by pet owners how to get rid of pet odors. Whether it is goopy eyes or stinky ears and skin, my answer is always the same—coconut oil!

I’ve been in the dog grooming industry since 1997. We always use natural and botanical products at Mia & Company.  Sometimes that isn’t enough.

Fed regularly to pets, coconut oil can have many health benefits for their skin, digestive and immune systems, metabolic function, even their bone and brain health! Here are some of my top reasons for adding coconut oil to your dog’s diet:

Coconut oil improves overall skin health and clears up skin conditions such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis and itchy skin. It can reduce bad breath. Dog lovers even brush their pets’ teeth with it, as they love the taste.

Incredibly emollient, coconut oil helps moisturize the driest skin and makes a dog’s coat gleam with health—whether you add it to her diet, her shampoo or both!

Applied topically to the skin, coconut oil promotes the healing of cuts, wounds, hot spots, bites and stings.

The antibacterial and antifungal properties of coconut oil help reduce doggie odor, and the pleasant, tropical aroma imparts a delightful scent to a dog’s skin and coat.

Coconut oil prevents and treats yeast infections, including candida. The antiviral agents also help dogs recover quickly from kennel cough.

I would recommend starting your pet on a low dose. If you have a small dog or cat, less than 15 pounds, start out using a one-fourth teaspoon.  If you have a medium to large breed, start out using one-half teaspoon. Once applied to their dog food, it absorbs immediately. Any brand will work but make sure it’s unrefined.

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

Marilyn King, An Inside Look at OKC Pets’ Publisher

posted June 27th, 2016 by
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Nicole Castillo

Marilyn King

is the owner and publisher of OKC Pets. Born and raised in Oklahoma, her passion for publishing is a labor of love over 30 years in the making. I took some time to sit down with Marilyn and learn more about the foundation of this local magazine.Marilyn King

When did you get involved in the publishing business?

“Golly, my first job out of college was with an international publishing firm in Tulsa. I spent over 20 years there and worked in every department except accounting, but mostly in editorial and ad sales. I took a small break in between that job and spent a year in San Francisco working for another publisher, then resumed my job in Tulsa. I’ve been in publishing ever since.”

What made you decide to start OKC Pets? 

“I started TulsaPets in 2006.   I dreamed up the idea of a pet’s magazine “on a whim” and it’s grown and remains healthy.  I had time on my hands and always wanted to do OKC Pets with my family ties there, so I took the plunge in 2013 and my first issue of OKC Pets published in March 2014.”

Why did you choose a pet magazine?

“I’m a lifelong pet lover and knew how much I loved my pets and how much I lavish every good thing upon them (my vet tells people that if he’s coming back to this earth, he wants to come back as one of my pets!), and I knew other people were the same way about their pets.  Plus, the pet market is a HUGE market.  When I was little our pets had Purina Dog Chow and Milk Bones and a few rubber toys.  Now there’s every brand/type of food known to man available, veterinary medicine has grown by leaps and bounds with advances in the care of our pet’s health, and the pet toy market is simply out of sight.”

How long have you lived in Oklahoma?

“Me?  Well, I was born in Oklahoma, in Tulsa.  At St. John Hospital.  All my staff are okies except for Anna my editor, who hails from Louisiana.  Most of my staff was born at St. Anthony’s Hospital and grew up and still live in the heart of OKC.  Some people say we’re not “local” but if they believe that they need to research the meaning.  We distribute our magazine over the OKC metro and we’re a solely-owned (me) Oklahoma Corporation, with no ties to any other large group or corporation.  We’re all for keeping it local in Oklahoma and we advocate for ALL Oklahoma animals.  We’re about as Okie as it gets.”

What does OKC Pets do for the animals of the metro?

“OKC Pets Magazine is more than just a magazine.  It’s a magazine with a mission, as with my TulsaPets.  It always has been, and always will be.  We advocate pet rescue and adoption, and education about the importance of spaying and neutering pets and responsible pet ownership.  We’ve spent too many days in local shelters to have any other mission.  Our magazine also gives back to the OKC Community as we sponsor many, many fund raisers, give free advertising to the local animal non-profits, and auction our cover off in an annual online auction.  All proceeds go to a local animal non-profit.”

Do you have any pets?

“Yes, two dogs that are rescued hounds.  My Sam was a stray walking down my street as a pup that no one claimed after 9 days, and my Elmer came from the Tulsa pound.

Sam is a beautiful chocolate lab (he was obviously dumped as he had an imprint of where he had worn a collar), and Elmer is a complete mutt mix.  We did a DNA test on Elmer and he’s Weimaraner and Shar-Pei, of all things!  Elmer rules the house and if Elmer isn’t happy, no one is happy.”

What are your plans for the magazine?

“We’re going to keep growing this puppy and increase our circulation/readership and keep promoting our mission.  2017 will mark our third birthday and we look forward to many more years of pet publishing.

Is there a particular story you would like to share of your experience being OKC Pets’ publisher?

The recent story of Big Paul: In the South Field was one that really got me.  I urge every pet lover to read this story.  It’s a tear-jerker but one I’ll remember for years to come.”

Besides supplying the OKC metro with a stellar magazine, Marilyn has given new and unpublished writers a voice and a chance to see their work in print. My first published article was in OKC Pets almost a year ago. Two of my colleagues have the same story. Seeing my words on the glossy pages of that first issue is something I will always remember. I still have at least 10 copies of that issue in my office!

Marilyn’s goal is to unite the pet lovers of Oklahoma to support our four-legged friends who do not have a voice. Our mission for each issue is to inform and excite the wonderful readers of Oklahoma City and under her clever guidance, we’re doing just that.

 

No Miracle Worker

posted June 24th, 2016 by
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Holiday Gift

No Miracle Worker

The 4th of July – – a day to celebrate what it means to live in America. For those who’ve served our country or lived in a third-world country – – it has a special meaning. There will be picnics, family get togethers, barbecue, homemade ice cream and fireworks – – lots and lots of fireworks.

For those of us who work in rescue, we also know it is the time, each year, that thousands of dogs are lost. The loud noises scare them; they’re in unfamiliar surroundings and they bolt; their collars with ID are not on them; their owners forgot to have them micro-chipped; they’re micro-chipped, but their owners didn’t change the registration from the shelter.

And, on July 5th the phones will start ringing. People will want to drop off a dog they found in their yard; a dog they rescued running down the street; a dog someone dumped in their neighborhood. Likewise, all of us will get calls from frantic pet owners, all too frequently, demanding that we find their dog NOW.

Here’s where the rubber meets the road and it gets interesting. No shelter, no rescue, no one can take in all the dogs that are homeless in this area. Why??? Because there are too many homeless dogs already in shelters and rescues.

There is literally No Room in the Inn.

Soooo – – we will celebrate along with our family and friends, then come to work on Tuesday July 5th, take a deep breath and get ready. Tragically, it happens every year and in areas, like northeast Oklahoma, where there are thousands of homeless dogs and cats – – rescuers will bear the brunt of unhappy adults who expect a Miracle.

And

There Is No Miracle Worker

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

No Miracle Worker

9th Street Barking Lot

posted June 24th, 2016 by
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Nicole Castillo

9th Street Barking Lot

9th StreetThe 9th Street Barking Lot offers a plethora of playful and pampering services to the canine companions of Oklahoma City. This urban dog daycare has full and half-day daycare, large swimming pools, grooming services and a self-service dog wash. I was fortunate enough to correspond with the creator and owner of this establishment, Kyle Gillum, and learn more about the conquest, troubles and triumphs of this establishment.
Kyle Gillum wanted a change. After eight years at SandRidge Energy, he made the decision to work for himself and begin a new business. “My Dad challenged me to examine the things that were important to me in my life.” says Kyle. “The common thread was my family, my dogs, and a couple other elements.” He noticed that there were no urban dog daycares in the immediate downtown Oklahoma City area, and set out to find a location. This was back in the summer of 2013. After purchasing a the perfect building for his dream, Kyle learned about a state zoning law that prohibited any dog harboring facilities (specifically breeding businesses) to be within 2,500 feet of daycares or schools. “We went on a 2 year political adventure trying to get this amended that resulted in getting the law amended after hiring lobbyists to bring awareness to what we were trying to do.” With this success, Kyle was able to continue work on the 9th Street Barking Lot, and celebrated the grand opening in March 2016.
9th StreetWhen the doors open at 7am, there is not a dull moment at the Barking Lot until they close at 6pm. Dogs can swim, chase balls, romp around with other dogs and be loved on by excellent dog handlers. There is a small dog and a big dog area so each guest can be insured a good time. If your dog deserves a relaxing day at the spa or an exciting excursion carousing with friends, give Kyle a call at 405-212-2220. You may also check them out on Facebook or their website 9thstreetbarkinglot.com for more info and pricing.  Exit 10th Street off the Broadway Extension downtown and they are right there on 9th Street.  Imagine that!

Reward offered in Oklahoma City cat cruelty case

posted June 22nd, 2016 by
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Reward

The Humane Society of the United States is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­abandoning 24 cats in four small pet carriers, leaving them to starve and suffocate to death in sweltering summer temperatures in Oklahoma City.

This HSUS’ reward is in addition to $2,500 offered by the Oklahoma Alliance for Animals to make the total reward $7,500.

The Case: According to news reports, on June 10, Oklahoma City Animal Welfare discovered the pet carriers thrown behind tall grass in a field near the intersection of S. MacArthur Road and Newcastle Road.

Reports suggest the carriers were thrown from a vehicle while the animals were still alive. Workers removed two dozen dead cats: three from the first crate, seven from the second crate, six from the third crate and eight from the final crate.

Based on the conditions of their bodies and the maggots in the cages, officers estimate the cats were in the field for one week.

Animal Cruelty: Getting the serious attention of law enforcement, prosecutors and residents in cases involving allegations of cruelty to animals is an essential step in protecting the community. The connection between animal cruelty and human violence is well documented. Studies show a correlation between animal cruelty and all manner of other crimes, from narcotics and firearms violations to battery and sexual assault.

The HSUS recently conducted a series of trainings on animal cruelty laws and how to handle animal cruelty cases from first response to prosecution for more than 700 law enforcement personnel across the state of Oklahoma.

Cynthia Armstrong, Oklahoma senior state director for The HSUS said: “Abandoning these animals to die a slow and excruciating death is a despicable act of animal cruelty. We hope our reward helps find the person or persons who committed this heinous crime.”

Jamee Suarez, president of the Oklahoma Alliance for Animals said: “It is a truly callous individual who would pack these innocent cats into tiny carriers, toss them along a roadside like garbage and then drive away to let them starve to death.”

The Investigators: The Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division is investigating and asks anyone with information about the case to call 405-297-3100 or Crime Stoppers at 405-235-7300.

Resources: The HSUS Animal Cruelty Campaign raises public awareness and educates communities about the connection between animal cruelty and human violence while providing a variety of resources to law enforcement agencies, social work professionals, educators, legislators and families. The HSUS offers rewards in animal cruelty cases across the country and works to strengthen laws against animal cruelty.

The National Sheriffs’ Association and The HSUS launched ICE BlackBox, a free smartphone tool, to allow users to record video of illegal animal cruelty and share it securely with law enforcement for possible investigation and prosecution.

The HSUS doubled its standard cruelty reward from $2,500 to $5,000 thanks to a generous donation from an HSUS board member. To see information on statistics, trends, laws and animal cruelty categories, click here.  

Twister’s New Home

posted June 21st, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

Twister’s New Home

By Lauren Cavagnolo

Photos by Sirius Photography

 

Displaced after the Moore tornadoes, a dog finds his place at the Tulsa Boys’ Home

“A house just isn’t a home without a dog.”

It’s a statement to which many TulsaPets Magazine readers can relate. And now, so can the young men of the Tulsa Boys’ Home.

Though it is temporary, the campus is home for the boys, says Jeff Johnson, volunteer coordinator for the Tulsa Boys’ Home. And for many people, the idea of a home includes a dog.

So when the staff decided to adopt a young chocolate Lab named Twister a year and a half ago, the boys were thrilled.

“This is their shot at having a pet. When these kids look back on their life, and some-one says, ‘Did you have a pet growing up?’ this is going to be the one that 64 of these boys refer to,” Johnson says.

The boys living at the facility in Sands Springs range in age from 11 to 17 years old. The group provides assistance to those struggling with substance addiction, as well as boys who have become wards of the state for a variety of reasons including abuse and neglect. The length of stay can vary from six months to two years, depending on the program and needs of the boy.

Not unlike some of the boys residing there, Twister’s journey to the Tulsa Boys’ Home began with misfortune. On May 20, 2013, the town of Moore was struck by an EF5 tornado. Many pets, including Twister, were separated from their families in the destruction of the storm.

Oklahoma City-based organization A New Leash On Life, Inc., took in many of these animals, as residents tried to piece their homes and lives back together. 

“He was found, and we housed a lot of dogs here during the 30 days when their owners were looking for them. He is one that was never claimed,” says Barbara Lewis, CEO of A New Leash On Life, Inc.

A decision was made to enroll him in the Pen Pals Prison Program, a 10-week course that pairs inmates with shelter dogs. The inmates teach the dogs basic manners, obedience, and correct any behavioral problems.

Since they didn’t know his name, and he was a refugee of the Moore tornado, the inmates named him Twister, according to Lewis.

“About the time they were ready to graduate, we were contacted by the Tulsa Boys’ Home. They were looking for a resident dog, and I said, ‘I think I have just the dog for you,’” Lewis says.

 

Unconditional Love

‘The interaction with the boys and Twister is amazing to watch,” says Kaycee Aragon, manager of the Eagle Lodge on the Tulsa Boys’ Home campus. “Sometimes these boys will have the worst day ever, and they will come through these doors, and it’s a whole different demeanor when they see Twister. They go from being mad to happy.”

Johnson says most of the kids on campus have not been raised in a traditional family setting and don’t fully grasp the concepts of unconditional love and forgiveness.

“These things they can’t even relate to; you can’t even describe it to them because they don’t have a reference point,” Johnson says. “Now with this dog, they can see [he] loves them unconditionally. This dog does not care if they threw a radio through the window earlier; that dog is still going to love them. Most of them probably haven’t had someone who treats them that way.”

Stormy Bullard, youth and family counselor at the Tulsa Boys’ Home, says Twister is present for many of the therapy sessions, bringing with him a calming effect on the boys. He also provides a welcome dis-traction, helping the boys to open up about more difficult or uncomfortable topics.

 “He definitely helps them in ways that we probably don’t even realize,” Bullard says.

The benefits of having a canine on campus extend beyond the therapy sessions. “They learn how to be more empathetic, how they treat him and how that relates to their other relationships,” Bullard says.

Having Twister around also adds that homey element to the campus. “When they are having a bad day, they just want to hang out with him or snuggle with him,” Bullard says.

And when the boys need a playmate to let loose with, Twister is their perfect companion. “A lot of these boys have a lot of energy,” Johnson says. “That dog is not going to get tired. You can take him out to the pond with a stick and throw it all day long and wear these boys out one at a time.”

“There is so much more love around here now that we have a dog.” Johnson adds. “All of the other lodges want a dog. They all want the dog to live in their lodge.”

 

Twice the Fun

Through the support of an anonymous donor, A New Leash On Life, Inc., provides the Tulsa Boys’ Home with dog food each year. And when they made their yearly delivery in December, it was the perfect opportunity to let Lewis know they were ready for a second dog.

“I had a couple of dogs just show up on my porch and couldn’t find the owners,” Lewis says. “And I said if you don’t mind a three-legged dog, I have just the dog. And we let the boys name him, and they named him Captain Jack.

“When I delivered him, I told the boys, it’s going to be up to you guys to train him to come when he is called and sit and lie down and do all the basic stuff. That’s what they are doing.”

And the boys couldn’t be happier about it. Jacob Hardin, a resident of Tulsa Boys’ Home, helped train Captain as he affectionately calls him. Even though it is more responsibility and work, to Hardin it is worth it.

 “I’ve been a dog person for a long time, but moving around so much I never really had a dog to stay with. Now I actually get to be here with a dog  and help train him,” Hardin says.

Hardin says having the dogs on campus has encouraged the boys to be more active and gives them a reason to go outside and play. The dogs even help some of the boys get along better.

“Not many kids here get along with each other; he brought some kids back together,” Hardin says. “There are kids here who don’t have a friend but have Twister.”

Captain Jack, in particular, has been a companion to Hardin, hanging out in his room and listening to him practice guitar.

“When you don’t have someone to talk to, there you go; he’ll sit down and listen to you, every word, and he won’t go until you say you want to be alone,” Hardin says of Captain.

Johnson is equally pleased with the addition of Captain Jack to the Tulsa Boys’ Home campus.

“Once again, she hit a home run. Barbara understands this place,” Johnson says. “With the New Leash On Life program, they have been so supportive of us. They don’t just give us a dog and disappear. They are there to help us out and support us. They care about these dogs and want them to have a right fit.”

And as much as the dogs help the boys, the boys are just as important to the dogs.

“[Twister] lost his family,” Johnson says, “And so now, they can be his family.”