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Oklahoma Standard

posted April 4th, 2016 by
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Senior Advantage

Oklahoma Standard

 

Oklahoma StandardOklahomans set the Oklahoma Standard for rescue following the 1995 bombing of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City.  The rescue efforts truly showed Oklahomans at their finest and proved what can happen when everyone comes together for a common goal – to find survivors and account for everyone

 

Oklahoma City voters approved MAPS 1, MAPS2, and MAPS3 –  civic leaders and citizens worked together to present a well-thought-out, unified, opportunity to change the face of OKC.  Today Oklahoma City is recommended as a destination city in travel guides.  I can remember when they rolled up the sidewalks by 7:00 every night – there was nothing to do, see, eat, enjoy, attend.  Not so today.

 

We can set the standard in rural Oklahoma for responsible pet ownership.  At present, hundreds of rescues, individuals, and municipal shelters daily face the sad fact that wonderful, adoptable, lovable animals do not get a chance to live because they are homeless or unwanted.  This past weekend, PAAS transported 13 to Denver Dumb Friends League (don’t let the name fool you), held a successful PetSmart adoption event (13 adoptions) on Saturday at the Stapleton PetSmart in Denver and have two living in a Colorado foster home.  Hundreds of dogs from rural. Oklahoma were transported by car, van, transport bus or plane.  They shared one thing in common  – they were homeless in Oklahoma, but they wouldn’t be once they left the state.

 

When you work in rescue, there are dogs that speak to your heart and you’re forever changed.  Some of them, for me, have been Blackie, Brownie, Megan, TuffTuff, and Daisy.  Look in the mirror, talk with your friends, figure it out, then get together with others.  We can set the Oklahoma Standard – – YES, WE CAN.

Lost Pet Found

posted March 30th, 2016 by
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Coconut Oil

Lost Pet Found

By LaWanna Smith

An action plan for dealing with every pet owner’s worst nightmare

It was a warm afternoon when the faint sound of thunder rumbled in the distance. I had just arrived home after running a quick errand, and my dogs greeted me at the back gate as I pulled in the driveway. Well, all but one furry face; Baxter, my 10-year-old Shepherd mix, was missing.
An unsettling feeling passed through my stomach as I recalled hearing the thunder. Baxter had always been afraid of storms and other loud noises, but the approaching storm was still too far away for my husband to hear it from inside the house. I did a quick search of the property and found no sign of Baxter. Previously, when a storm had panicked him, he jumped the fence, but he was still nearby and came running right back when I called. But not this time.
Trying to stay calm, I got into my car and began driving our walking path in the neighborhood with no luck. After about 30 minutes of searching, I was officially scared.
This lost dog story does have a happy ending. After 48 hours of canvassing the area, posting 100-plus signs, listing Baxter on numerous websites, placing an ad in the paper and putting more than 250 miles on each of our two cars, we brought Baxter home—tired, full of fleas and pretty scared, but otherwise fine.
Over the course of two days, he had traveled about 10 miles that we could track, though likely more. We were able to follow his route by the calls we received in response to our signs. Ultimately, a very kind person responding to one 8” x 10” sign led us straight to our boy for a happy reunion.
Unfortunately, not all lost pet stories have a happy ending. Statistics show that one in every three dogs will become lost in its lifetime with only a small percentage recovered.
Your immediate actions upon discovering your pet is missing can be the difference between success and heartbreak. Following is a list of helpful tips for recovering a lost pet:
Act fast.
It is a fallacy that pets will find their way home on their own. By immediately beginning your recovery process, your odds of finding your pet increase greatly. Get out on foot; walk your neighborhood and knock on doors. Dogs tend to travel while cats tend to hide out, generally fairly close to home. The more people know to keep an eye out for your pet, the better.
Check the likely spots. Do you and your dog have a normal walk you take in the area? Is there a park or a house with other dogs your dog likes to visit? Are there neighborhood kids your dog enjoys? Check all the likely “fun spots” first. For lost cats, search the area around your home carefully and then expand your search to likely hiding places around neighboring homes (with permission, of course). Sometimes use of a humane cat trap with a little yummy food in it will do the trick. Check with your animal shelter to see if you can borrow or rent a trap.
Enlist help and post signs!
Have someone start making fliers and signs featuring a current photo of your pet while you do your initial search. Make sure your cell phone number is included on your signs, so you can be reached immediately at any time of the day or night. Keep your cell phone battery charged!
Keep your signs simple and the text large. Your signs must be very legible. Passing motorists must be able to read them quickly and easily. A good tip for keeping your signs fresh and waterproof is to put each flier in a clear, gallon-sized zip closure baggie.
Give fliers to all of your neighbors and post signs at all entrances/exits to your neighborhood. Ask permission to post signs in yards near intersections. Give fliers to your mail carrier and any delivery people who happen to frequent your neighborhood. Also, post signs at all major intersections in your search area.
Start working in a circle from the point where your pet was lost. With each 24-hour period that passes without recovery, expand your sign placement another mile in each direction. Never think your pet “won’t go that way” or “won’t go that far,” especially with dogs. You might be amazed how quickly four legs can travel.
Post notices at all local veterinary clinics, grocery stores, community centers and any other public business that will accept a flier. Be sure to hit all animal-based business such as pet supply stores, training schools, dog daycares, boarding kennels, etc. People who love their own pets are more likely to notice and offer assistance to a stray animal. Place an ad in the lost and found section of the newspaper immediately. People who find a stray pet often look there first.
Take your search online.
Modern technology is a great thing, and now your computer or smart phone can provide the key to locating your lost pet. A quick post to Facebook, on your general feed and on specific lost and found pages, can yield great results or leads. Twitter can work similarly. Websites such as findtoto.com offer phone services (fees specified on the site) to contact people in your area to notify them of your missing pet. This can be a fast, effective way to spread the word. Local rescue groups also offer pet lost and found listings.
Check with local shelters and organizations.
Visit local animal shelters and notify all animal rescue organizations. File a lost pet report with every shelter in your vicinity and visit the nearest shelters daily if possible. Many shelters are only required to hold animals for a 72-hour period before they can put them up for adoption or authorize euthanasia. You cannot rely on calling to ask if your pet is at the shelter. The OKC Animal Shelter alone houses hundreds of animals, and it is virtually impossible for the person answering the phone to know for sure whether your pet has been checked in that day or not. Plus, only you can truly identify your pet.
Do provide all animal control agencies and rescue groups with an accurate description and a clear photo of your pet, along with all of your contact information. To locate contact information for other area shelters and rescue groups, refer to the Directory portion of www.okcpetsmagazine.com.
Use Caution.
If someone claims to have your pet, meet in a public place. Do not give out your home address and do not agree to go to the home of an unknown person. Ask them to meet you at a local veterinarian office, pet supply or other public place to return your pet. Be wary of pet recovery scams. When talking with someone who claims to have found your pet, ask him to describe the pet thoroughly. If the caller does not include specific identifying marks or characteristics, he may not actually have your pet. Be particularly wary of people who ask you to give or wire them money for the return of your pet. It’s OK to offer a reward, but it can attract people with less than honest intentions.
Don’t give up your search! Animals that have been lost for weeks and even months have been reunited with their owners. Keep the word out there.
And once you find your pet, collect all of the signs you have posted. Leaving up signs once a pet has been found is not only pollution but also unfair clutter for those people who still have missing pets.
Proper ID
Of course, keeping proper identification on your pet at all times is pertinent to a speedy reunion in a lost and found situation. A collar with vet tags, city license and a personalized tag will help keep your pet safe. However, collars can be lost, so it is recommended to talk to your veterinarian about permanent identification such as a microchip. A chip about the size of a piece of rice is injected under your pet’s skin in the shoulder region. When a scanner is passed over the site of the chip, it pulls up an identification number that leads to all necessary information for locating that animal’s rightful owners.
Even under the most protected circumstances, pets can slip through open doors, sturdy fences can be jumped or crawled under, and gates can be left open by workmen or kids. If the unthinkable does happen to you, remember that a good plan and quick action can lead to a safe and happy recovery.

Toxic Food for Dogs

posted March 28th, 2016 by
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Toxic Food

Toxic Food for Dogs

It’s hard to resist tossing your dog a few scraps after dinner, but you might want to reconsider. Did you know that some human food is dangerous – or even fatal – for your pooch?

Toxic Foods for Dogs 2

 http://www.gapnsw.com.au

Spring Events

posted March 27th, 2016 by
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Ween Pic 36

Spring Events

SpringWe didn’t get much of a winter this year, but now that spring is well, springing, it is prime ween-scene time. Here are some events you should put on your calendar:Bricktown St. Patrick’s Day Block Party, Thursday March 17th 2 PM to midnight. This festival of all things green will be held right along the Bricktown Canal, one of my favorite places to walk/sniff/pee in the whole city. Nope. We were turned away at the gate. We really don’t see what the difference is between this and any of the other many outdoor food truck events where I am welcome (especially since Bricktown itself is extremely dog-friendly) but WHATEVS! Tacos at Fuzzy’s and an after dinner drink at Sauced aren’t particularly Irish, but I’ll take it. (updated 3-18)

Season Opener of Heard on Hurd, Saturday March 19th 6 PM to 10 PM along Broadway in downtown Edmond. We like to show up a little early and have a pre-drink at the Patriarch. (Recurring dates every 3rd Saturday through October.)  See our review here.

Eats on 8th & Harvey, Friday March 25th 6 PM to 11 PM. This is sort of the successor to H&8th, since it has gone bye-bye. We have not attended this festival. What with the demise of H&8th, and no current publicized dates for Premiere on Film Row, we would image this will be popular. (Recurring dates the last Friday of each month through November.)

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Wags to Riches

posted March 27th, 2016 by
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Wags to Riches

Wags to Riches

Finding Treasure at the Myriad Easter Egg Hunt

Wags to Riches

Myriad Botanical Gardens was a colorful hub-hub of activity this Saturday morning. They had 6 children’s hunts and 1 dog hunt scheduled for the day. That is a lot of kids and dogs. That is also the setup for a fun and interesting day! Wags to RichesMy husband Carlos and I walked through a throng of children who locked eyes on our border collie mix, Cheyanne, and at once made a beeline for her. We slowly made it through the tiny, reaching hands and found the dog egg hunt area. I set up the table for OKC Pets, complete with magazines and plastic eggs filled with poo bags and began my most favorite part of any pet festival, people and dog watching. There were sweet calm dogs in dresses and young puppies looking at the overwhelming scene in the arms of their human. A woman in a black velvet jumpsuit, shiny black platform heels, a tall curly pink wig, a bouquet of Easter flowers, and a sweet little dog walked around and just made everyone’s day with her festive fanciness.
My friend and fellow writer Kaycee Chance and her pit bull/mastiff mix, Sparrow, showed up to help with the table and together we handed out our swag and got to know the friendly folks who love a good dog Easter egg hunt. It was a gorgeous day to be out and about with blues skies and a light breeze. The infectious fun of the event made a pleasant hum of happy people.
Wags to RichesThe Easter Bunny came out to walk amongst the four-legged guests, but he created quite a stir when he spooked a few dogs. A man in a bunny suit can never rest amongst a large group of dogs. Sooner or later, instinct kicks in and the canines are ready to hunt the bunny and not the eggs. After being barked at for a few minutes, the Easter bunny hopped away to his more loving audience of children.
They run a dog egg hunt much like a children’s egg hunt. A large area of lawn is roped off and the eggs are scattered there. Expectant hunters wait around the ropes and when the time comes, everyone ducks under the partition and “searches for eggs.” The rules were that if your dog touches an egg with it’s nose, you take that egg. You quickly learn that the real rules are that if your dog steps on, kicks, or looks at an egg, you take it, because there is way too much going on for a dog to care about eggs on the ground. Imagine, an oblong piece of land, people on each side coming at each other at the same time. I’m sure if you recorded it from the middle of the hunting ground, it would like the happiest, weirdest battle scene ever, because instead of killing each other, we laugh and say how cute the other side’s dog is. Pure fun.
Wags to RichesThe highlight of the hunt was Lucas Ross from KFOR news playing the banjo for the dogs after the hunt. He also sang a song about dogs but I cannot recall the words. I just remember the chorus was barking. We met with Lucas after the hunt and he asked if he could play his banjo for our dogs. He told us that he wanted to perform for dogs because he saw Steve Martin do the same and the canines just ignored him. He kneeled down in front of Cheyanne and Sparrow and began serenading them. Our pups were unimpressed by his antics and looked around before walking off and leaving him strumming in the wind. It was hilarious. Steve Martin knew what he was talking about.
Some of the eggs at the hunt had a ticket in them to win a prize and although our dogs did not get a basket of goodies they got a personal performance from a local celebrity, a handful of treats, the chance to bark at a man in a bunny suit and the priceless chance to pee in a new place so all in all, everyone’s a winner at the Myriad Gardens Doggy Easter Egg Hunt.

Boren Veterinary Hospital

posted March 21st, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

Boren Veterinary Hospital – Preventative Care to Pacemaker Surgery

Boren Veterinary Hospital at Oklahoma State University Provides a Full Spectrum of Animal Healthcare

By Bria Bolton Moore

Photos by Gary Lawson, University Marketing

 

In the wake of a May 2013 tornado that whipped through the Sooner State, Evie was found wandering the streets of Shawnee, Okla. 

The 2-year-old black and tan Shepherd was one of 60 animals brought to Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital in Stillwater following the tornado.

“We had several clients where, at the moment, they felt like they had lost their pet, but it was here, brought to OSU by a Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Mark Neer, DVM and director of the Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital at Oklahoma State University. “There’s no words you can say to describe that feeling where they thought everything was totally hopeless, and it turned out they had their pet back and also had it back healthy.”

Following the storms, the veterinary hospital treated 22 dogs, 15 cats, 11 horses, four woodpeckers, two guinea pigs, two birds, one donkey, one pot-bellied pig, one chicken and one turtle. Although many were reconnected to their owners, Evie was never claimed. After heartworm and tick treatment, Evie was adopted by University staff member

Lorinda Schrammel and went on to become a member of Pete’s Pet Posse, a group of trained therapy dogs at OSU. Evie is now schooled to provide comfort to people in nursing homes, schools or even those who have been through traumatic experiences like tornadoes.

Since its establishment in 1948, the hospital and College of Veterinary Medicine have worked toward outcomes like Evie’s: restored health and positive pet/owner relationships.

For more than 30 years, the teaching hospital and clinic were located in Oklahoma State’s McElroy Hall. Then, in 1981, the Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital opened. Today, the hospital is just one of a collection of buildings and facilities that make up the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Dr. Neer said the hospital’s veterinarians   see about 15,000 cases a year in the 145,000-square-foot facility. About 12,000 are small- animal cases tending to dogs, cats, birds   and others.

“We see everything from birds to pocket pets to reptiles,” Dr. Neer said.

About 3,000 of the cases are focused on caring for large-animal patients like horses, cows, sheep, goats and swine.

Dr. Neer said the staff continues to see more and more animals each year. In fact, in the last three years, the caseload has grown almost 30 percent per year.

Dr. Neer said a common misconception is that veterinary students are the ones providing all the pet care. However, an entire team cares for each patient with the over-sight of a faculty member who is a veterinary specialist.

“An important thing for people to under-stand is that when they bring their pet here, especially when it’s in the hospital, we have a team of caregivers, which include a faculty member (a specialist), an intern, a resident, a registered veterinary technician and a veterinary student,” Dr. Neer said. “So, you have a team of four to five people that are involved daily in the care of the pet, so they get a tremendous amount of one-on-one TLC from that whole group. It’s not one person; it’s a whole team providing that pet care.”

Although the hospital has an active community clinic providing primary care for pets in and around Stillwater, most of the   animals seen at the hospital are there to be examined by a veterinary specialist such as a cardiologist, ophthalmologist, radiologist or oncologist. Most of these clients and their pets are referred to OSU by their home-  town veterinarian and travel from Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, northern Texas and across Oklahoma to seek the expertise of specialists like Dr. Ryan Baumwart, DVM, a veterinary cardiologist.

On a typical weekday, Dr. Baumwart begins his morning by checking to see if there were any emergency transfers to the cardiology department overnight. Then, he begins rounds, checking on the patients currently under his care. After that, around 8 a.m., there’s usually a training, lecture or presentation focused on equipping fourth-year veterinary students. About 9 a.m., Dr. Baumwart begins seeing cases with students. For the most part, he’s seeing scheduled clients “where their dog or cat might have a heart murmur or have passed out, and they thought it might be due to a heart condition,” Dr. Baumwart said. “We end up looking at their pet and doing some additional testing. The majority of testing that I do diagnostically is ultrasounding the heart or echocardiograms. That’s the bulk of my day—trying to figure out what’s wrong with the heart.”

Dr. Baumwart said the majority of the patients he sees are dogs and cats, and   while most of the cardiac treatments are medical, some are surgical, like pacemaker implantation surgery.

“We just put a pacemaker in a cat yesterday, which is pretty uncommon to put pacemakers in cats, and we’ve put two in [cats] in the past couple of months,” he said.

Dr. Baumwart said most veterinarians don’t have a board-certified specialty, but he wants pet owners to know that specialty care is available if they should ever need it.

“I have two responses when I tell people what I do,” Dr. Baumwart said. “One is, ‘Oh my god, that’s amazing. I can’t believe you get to do that. That’s awesome for the owners and clients.’ Then, the other response is, ‘Who would take their dog to a cardiologist?’ We’re here for that first group of people—if they ever get into a situation where they want to take it further to get some more information or get some treatment options or pursue a surgical option, that’s what we’re here for.”

Although Dr. Baumwart has worked at other clinics and hospitals, he said the caring nature of everyone, from the receptionist to the technical staff to the doctors, makes OSU a special place.

“I think there’s that true caring about people and their animals, and people want that,” he said. “A lot of the animals we see are people’s kids. For the most part, people really care about their animals, and they want to see that from us. And I think that’s probably a big thing that Oklahoma State has that I love and the reason I came back.”

Shawn Kinser fell in love with veterinary care in high school while working for a clinic cleaning cages in his hometown of Boswell, Okla. Fast forward about a decade, and Kinser is now a fourth-year veterinary student, learning about different disciplines through three-week rotations in the hospital.

Kinser has cared for numerous animals that remind him why he loves his work. However, a 4-week-old kitten holds a special place in his training memories. While away on a clinical rotation in Amarillo, Texas, Kinser was part of a team that cared for a stray kitten with a broken leg.

“I was able to participate in the surgery to remove a front leg from the kitten,” Kinser said. “The surgery went very well, and the kitten is currently with one of the staff members who adopted the kitten. We were able to give the animal a fighting chance for a good life.”

Kinser also recently helped care for a Doberman Pinscher with cardiac disease. He said the close relationship between the owner and dog was special to witness. 

“Seeing the human-animal bond displayed so well like that makes me humbled to know that we can nurture that and contribute to strengthening that bond and keeping that bond intact,” he said.

Whether providing care for strays like Evie, someone’s beloved best friend like the Doberman Pinscher, a wild animal brought in by a resident do-gooder, or Oklahoma State’s Spirit Rider horse Bullet, the Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital is committed to providing the best animal care possible.