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Fassler Hall + Midtown Mutts Dog Park – OKC

posted November 27th, 2015 by
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Ween Pic 33

Fassler HallFassler Hall + Midtown Mutts Dog Park

The weather is finally cooling down some, which means it is prime ween-scene time. Saturday was the perfect day for exploring a new joint in the city, so we headed to Fassler Hall, 421 NW 10th St, OKC. Fassler Hall serves plenty of beer on tap, German-inspired food, and has tons and tons of outdoor seating.

A heads up that the entrance is a bit tricky to find. While the street address is 10th street, you actually have to go up the stairs between a gap in the building, and the entrance is to the left. Once we found it, mom verified with the bartender that I was allowed.

Depending on where you choose to sit, there is either table service (upper patio), or your order at the bar (lower patio). But the tables are clearly marked “order at the bar” to clear up… Read more

When words trump actions

posted November 24th, 2015 by
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Holiday Gift

When Words TrumpWhen words trump actions

This blog will be read by most people around the Thanksgiving holidays.  Trust me – I’m not going to write about family get-togethers, discussions, or traditions. This is about rescue.

Over the years I’ve frequently had “frying pan” experiences – where suddenly I just knew something.  One of my most memorable – and one that has stood the test of time is:  How do I want to be remembered?”.  There have been times I spoke up and, more often, times I zipped my lips.

I never forget that the dogs and cats who enter our lives do not care who we are – they’re just grateful we’ve saved them.  Those actions trump words every time.  The challenge, however, is too many passionate people who’re involved in rescue have no filter, or a really bad filter, on what they say and when they say it.  If you lose sight of saving the animals, the words that come out of their mouths will trump their actions.  When that happens, it’s the animals who pay the price – and they do not have a voice.

What puzzles me is why someone would want to be remembered not for the good they’ve done in rescue; but for the obnoxious, unprofessional, words that have spilled out of their mouths.  All too often those words derail a rescue, cause undue hardship, and create challenges for future collaboration.

At this time of year, if I had the power to give a gift to those in rescue, it would be the following:  Work together, zip the lip, and save lives.

Edmond Animal Shelter

posted November 23rd, 2015 by
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Edmond Animal Shelter

Edmond Animal Shelter

Edmond Animal Shelter showed off some its pets to  OKC Pets Magazine this week and we took these pictures of adorable animals available for adoption.

If you are thinking about a new family member, please consider saving the life of a homeless animal!

Visit the shelter and take home a new best friend!

Edmond Animal Shelter

Make a difference – adopt a shelter animal!

All of these pictures were taken Friday, November20th, by Madalyn Llewellyn

The shelter is open to the public:

Monday – Friday  10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Saturday  12:00 pm – 4:30 pm & Sunday  1:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Dog and Cat adoptions are $25

All animals are dewormed if necessary, appropriately vaccinated,

Dogs are HW neg. and Cats are FIV/FeL neg. and all are spayed or neutered

2424 Old Timbers Dr.   Edmond, OK 73034

(405) 216-7615

This Week’s Wednesday’s Children are available at the Edmond Animal Shelter.   There are some beautiful dogs and cats for adoption so please go rescue one today! Rescued pets make the best companions!!!  A big “THANKS” is owed to Madalyn Llewellyn for doing what she does every week!

Edmond Animal Shelter Adoptables

posted November 23rd, 2015 by
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Edmond Animal Shelter

OKC Pets Magazine toured the Edmond Animal  Shelter and took these pictures of adorable animals available for adoption. If you are thinking about a new family member, please consider saving the life of a homeless animal!

Visit the shelter and take home a new best friend!

Edmond Animal Shelter

Make a difference – adopt a shelter animal!

All of these pictures were taken Friday, November 20th, by Madalyn Llewellyn

The shelter is open to the public:

Monday – Friday  10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Saturday  12:00 pm – 4:30 pm & Sunday  1:00 pm – 4:30 pm

See us on Facebook

Dog and Cat adoptions are $25

All animals are dewormed if necessary, appropriately vaccinated,

Dogs are HW neg. and Cats are FIV/FeL neg. and all are spayed or neutered

2424 Old Timbers Dr.   Edmond, OK 73034

(405) 216-7615

This Week’s Wednesday’s Children are available at the Edmond Animal Shelter.   There are some beautiful dogs and cats for adoption so please go rescue one today! Rescued pets make the best companions!!!  A big “THANKS” is owed to Madalyn Llewellyn for doing what she does every week!

 

A Time for Reflection

posted November 21st, 2015 by
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20150115c

By Pat Becker

 

Every once in a while someone asks me how and why I became an animal enthusiast, a pet advocate, a dog lover. After all, I  have hosted a national PBS TV series, “The World of Dogs Biography Series,” a local radio show on KTOK, “Speak,” and a local TV show on KSBI, “Dog Talk.” So when I’m interviewed, it’s often the first question asked of me.

I’ve given it some thought. It occurred to me I was exposed to the charms of animals at an early age. I can only assume it was through my parents’ compassion for—and access to—puppies and kittens raised by my grandmother. Both my sisters and I learned the value of having furry, loving companions with whom we shared our secrets, our joys and our sorrows. To hold a tiny kitten, to be aware of its vulnerability and feel the obligation for its care taught us dependability.

We also took pride in having trained our dogs by gaining their trust. My family and I have long been involved in obedience trials. As a result, the tradition has been passed down to my daughters. I began showing my Cocker Spaniel in conformation classes at a young age. I trained my Beagle in agility and freestyle and my Canaan dog in barn hunting. Likewise, my daughter Lorri achieved a CDX title on her Old English Sheepdog and had the first Rat Terrier in the U.S. to win a Master award in Fly Ball. And we’ve hunted quail with seven fabulous Pointers for years.

Out of my love of animals I have developed close relationships with the best and brightest professionals in the country, having had the opportunity of highlighting their skills with dogs on my radio and television shows. I never tire of learning new information about dog training, medical updates for animals and the all-important psychology of evolution among our animals. Passing on exciting, educational data is my mission.

My experience as an actress with 20th Century Fox in the 60s, and as a singer with The William Morris Agency, gave me the confidence to feel comfortable in the area of communication as a media professional, allowing me to further the cause of loving and caring for our animal friends.

Through the years, most of my dogs have been adoptees. God blessed me with 46 furry companions in my lifetime. Some were purebreds; some were crossbreeds. Frankly, I saw more in them than their DNA and defined them by their good character, not a breed.

After all, I’ve never met a dog who could not be trained. However, I’ve met countless numbers of people who had a great deal of trouble communicating with their dogs and other people, a fact which might account for their lack of training skills.

When any of us in the business of dog advocacy are asked the question, “What in your opinion is the most important advice you can give to someone who has recently adopted a dog?” our answer is unanimous: learn to “speak dog!” You can’t understand a dog if you don’t have the ability to communicate with him.

We can truly learn to “talk” with our dogs. Dogs study our physical movement and the energy level of our vocal activity. Then they interpret and respond to our interactions with them. Trying to understand us and how to please us are necessary efforts which ensure our dogs’ survival. Sadly, many people are often inconsistent in their physical and emotional behavior, and it makes the dogs’ job harder.

Also, we can learn to read our dogs’ body language. From the tip of their ears to the tip of their tails, their bodies speak to us. Make it a point to study your dog’s active and reactive movements. It will make your lives together so much easier! Remember every time you interact with your dog you’re teaching him something about you, himself and the world around him. Make it something good!

 

Many hugs!

Pat Becker

Dog Talk

Kukur Tihar

posted November 17th, 2015 by
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Kukur Tihar

From http://themindunleashed.org/

There is an entire day during a festival in Nepal dedicated solely to thanking dogs for their loyalty and friendship. The time itself is called “Diwali” celebrated by Hindus, and is a ‘festival of lights’ celebrated by millions every year in the fall, in india, nepal and elsewhere.

Specific to Nepal, there is a day during this celebration dedicated to all the Dogs, called Kukur Tihar, specifically to thank our 4-legged companions for always being our loyal friends.

dogss
Image source: imgur

Tihar is a five day Hindu festival, but the second day is reserved for our loyal companions.

It is called Kukur Tihar or Kukur Puja (worship of the dogs).

festival for dogs
Image source: Imgur

People offer garlands, tika (a mark worn on the forehead), and delicious food to dogs, and acknowledge the cherished relationship between humans and dogs.

festival for dogs

The garlands are a sign of respect for the animals.

Because dogs are the best people.

festival for dogs
Image source: imgur.com
festival for dogs
Inage source: imgur

The images honoring these animals are truly breathtaking.

tihar
Image source

The thought of this beautiful festival is lightening the heavy hearts of dog lovers everywhere, amid horrendous news bites from another kind of festival in Yulin, China, recently.

dogss
Image source: Rebloggy

With red powder, the dogs are marked on their foreheads as a sign of sacredness.

I really love this.