Pet Health

Oklahoma State Free Service Animal Eye Exams

posted March 31st, 2018 by
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Oklahoma State

OSU

ACVO

Oklahoma State University Veterinary Medical Hospital to Provide Free Eye Exams to Oklahoma Service & Working Animals through the ACVO® and StokesRx Annual Event in May

Registration for the 2018 National Service Animal Eye Exam event in U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico opens April 1  

Stillwater, Oklahoma (March 29, 2018) – Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital to provide free eye exams to Service and Working Animals in Stillwater during the month of May as part of The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO®)’s 11th annual ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event. Board certified veterinary ophthalmologists across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico will collectively provide more than 7,500 free eye exams as part of the annual program in 2018.

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists is an approved veterinary specialty organization of the American Board of Veterinary Specialties that board certifies veterinarians as ophthalmologists. The organization developed the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event in 2008, and since its inception, nearly 60,000 Service and Working Animals have received free screening eye exams — including approximately 7,500 in 2017 during the 10th Anniversary event.

Honor, a three-year-old yellow lab Service Dog trained by Freedom Dogs in San Diego, received her first free eye exam during the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event in the 2017 10th Anniversary event (picture can be found here). Like many Service Dogs, Honor works loyally each day to help her handler, Marine, Cpl. TJ Melhus, with tasks such as, medication retrieval, retrieval of dropped items, blocking people from approaching, alerting of people approaching from behind, and redirecting anxiety attacks through pressure from her chin.

“It was so important for Honor to take part in the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event for the first time in 2017,” said Katie Stoll, Honor’s trainer/puppy raiser at Freedom Dogs. “The free eye exams provide Service Animal handlers with the comfort of knowing their animals are healthy — sight is an asset these dogs use each day to keep their handlers safe.”

Around 300 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico will donate their time and resources to provide free screening exams to Service and Working Animals in May. In addition to dogs, other Service or Working Animals including horses, miniature horses, donkeys, alpacas and cats can receive free sight-saving exams.

The goal of the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event is to provide as many free screening exams as possible to eligible Service and Working Animals. The following types of Working or Service Animals may qualify: guide, handicapped assistance, detection, military, search and rescue, and current, registered therapy animals – all whom selflessly serve the public.

This year’s event is sponsored by ACVO® and Stokes Pharmacy, as well as several generous industry sponsors.  Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital and participating board certified ophthalmologists volunteer their services, staff and facilities at no charge for Service and Working Animals and their owners/agents to participate in the event.

HOW TO REGISTER FOR THE 2018 EVENT:

 

To qualify, Service and Working Animals must be “active working animals” that have been trained through a formal training program or organization, or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The training organization could be national, regional or local in nature. More qualification details are available here. Owners/agents for the animal(s) must FIRST register the animal via an online registration form beginning April 1 at www.ACVOeyeexam.org. Registration ends April 30. Once registered online, the owner/agent will receive a registration number and will be allowed access to a list of participating ophthalmologists. Then, they may contact a specialist to schedule an appointment, which will take place during the month of May.  Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital requires that participants meet all event qualifications and provide the assigned registration number over the phone. Times may vary depending on the facility and are filled on a first-come, first-served basis, so owners/agents are encouraged to register and make appointments early.

About the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists®

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists® (ACVO®) is an approved veterinary specialty organization of the American Board of Veterinary Specialties, and is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Its mission is “to advance the quality of veterinary medicine through certification of veterinarians who demonstrate excellence as specialists in veterinary ophthalmology.” To become board certified, a candidate must successfully complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree, a one-year internship, a three-year ACVO® approved residency and pass a series of credentials and examinations. For more information, please visit www.ACVO.org.

About Stokes Pharmacy

Stokes Pharmacy is a national, full-service compounding pharmacy specializing in the art and science of the custom formulation of prescription medicines for humans and animals. Leading the way in innovation, Stokes invites veterinarians to prescribe compounded medications online securely, quickly, and accurately via iFill, a cloud-based prescription management system. For more information, visit stokesrx.com.

About Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital

Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital is part of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, one of only 30 veterinary colleges in the United States. The Hospital is open to the public and provides routine wellness and specialized care for small and large animals. Certified by the American Animal Hospital Association, the Hospital offers 24-hour emergency care. For more information, visit www.cvhs.okstate.edu or call (405) 744-7000.

Dr. Carlos Risco is new OSU Veterinary Dean

posted October 20th, 2017 by
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Carlos Risco

Oklahoma State names Dr. Carlos Risco Center for Veterinary Health Sciences dean

 

(STILLWATER, Okla., October 20, 2017) – The Oklahoma State University/A&M Board of Regents today approved the appointment of Dr. Carlos A. Risco as dean of the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. He is expected to assume his position in March.

Carlos RiscoRisco is currently at the University of Florida where he serves as a tenured professor and chair of the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences.

“I am excited for the opportunity to serve as dean,” Risco said. “The strong culture of scholarship, outstanding curriculum and the multidisciplinary approach to improve both animal and human health has led to the excellent reputation of the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.

“This reputation makes Oklahoma State a place where students want to attend,” Risco said. “As dean, I look forward to working with our talented faculty and staff to continue progress in the center’s role as a regional, national and international leader in veterinary medical education, research, and service.”

OSU Provost and Senior Vice President Gary Sandefur said, “We are pleased to have Dr. Risco join the OSU team. He will provide strong vision and leadership for our excellent veterinary program. I want to thank Vice President Thomas Coon and members of the search and screening committee for leading our national search and identifying an outstanding pool of candidates. I also appreciate Chris Ross and his solid leadership as interim dean.”

Risco received his DVM degree in 1980 from the University of Florida and advanced clinical training as an intern in private dairy practice at the Chino Valley Veterinary Associates in California. He is a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists.

From 1982 to 1990, he was a full partner at Chino Valley Veterinary Associates, a nine-veterinarian dairy practice. In 1990, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida as an assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Risco’s main research focus pertains to metabolic disorders and reproductive management of dairy cows.

 

CONTACT: Gary Shutt | OSU Communications | 405-744-4800 | [email protected]

Oklahoma State University is a modern land-grant university that prepares students for success. OSU has more than 36,000 students across its five-campus system and more than 25,000 on its combined Stillwater and Tulsa campuses, with students from all 50 states and around 120 nations. Established in 1890, Oklahoma State has graduated more than 260,000 students who have been serving Oklahoma and the world for 125 years. 

 

Derinda D. Blakeney, APR

Public Relations and Marketing Coordinator

Oklahoma State University

Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

308 McElroy Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078

(405) 744-6740 (office)

(405) 744-5233 (fax)

(405) 612-4019 (mobile)

[email protected]

Obstruction in Dogs

posted December 30th, 2016 by
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Grooming

Obstruction in Dogs

We can’t even begin to tell you the things we have seen at the ER that cause obstructions in dogs!!  Socks, towels, bedding… the list just goes on and on. 

Intestinal obstruction in dogs refers to complete or partial blockage of fluid and food flow through the small intestines.  This can quickly become a life-threatening situation. 

Symptoms to watch for that can indicate your dog is possibly obstructed include:

Vomiting

Loss of appetite

Straining during bowel movements

Diarrhea

Tarry stools

Inability to defecate

Lethargy

Burping

Excessive drooling

Abdominal bloating

Abdominal pain

Remaining still

Refusing to lie down

 

If you see your pet swallow something that can become stuck in their intestinal tract, take them to the vet immediately!  The vet will work to induce vomiting to try and produce the object.  If this is unsuccessful, the next step is to try an endoscope to pull the object back out with the last resort being surgery to remove the object from the intestinal tract. 

Your pet will require several days of hospitalization to ensure they have recovered completely.  All of this will make an obstruction a costly trip to the vet! 

Check your pets’ environment and remove any items that can potentially cause an obstruction.  Having your pet in a crate when you can’t be around is a good way to ensure they remain safe. 

Male Cat Urinary Obstruction

posted November 29th, 2016 by
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Holiday Safety

Male Cat Urinary Obstruction

One of the most common challenges we see in the ER when it comes to cats is urinary obstruction in male cats, also commonly called “blocked tom.”  The obstructions are developed when the tube that drains urine from the bladder becomes blocked when mucus, crystals or other small stones are formed in the kidneys and pass down through the bladder and become stuck. 

As a male cat owner, it is important to be aware of this problem and be vigilant in watching for symptoms.  Here are the most common symptoms to keep an eye out for:

~straining to urinate

~frequent urination

~blood in the urine

~painful urination

~inappropriate urination (urinating outside the litter box)

An examination at the first sign of these symptoms is important as urinary blockage can become life threatening if urine can’t empty from the bladder. 

Treatment often requires emergency care as the blockage may need to be flushed with a catheter or surgically removed. 

There are some ways to try and prevent urinary stones and potential blockage.  The following are some good practices for any cat:

~Keep your cat at a healthy weight.

~Give your cat canned food to help increase moisture and which also more closely resembles their natural diet.

~Keep water fresh and clean

~Make sure you have enough litter boxes for your cat/cats

~Minimize stress for your cat

Fall Tips for Animal Safety

posted October 6th, 2016 by
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Grooming

Fall Tips for Animal Safety

1. Beware of ticks! Just because the weather is getting cool doesn’t mean the ticks are gone. In fact, several species of ticks can survive until the first frost. Keep up your flea/tick prevention to help keep your pets safe from ticks and the diseases they carry with them.
2. The incidents of poison increase during the fall and winter months. We are already seeing cases of rat poisoning this year! If you have pets, rodenticides are just not worth the risk. Seek out other solutions to rid your home of rodents.
Anit-freeze is another poison concern. Propylene glycol is used to make both anti-freeze and used to preserve moisture content in some dog foods. It is sweet tasting, leading both dogs and cats to lick the anti-freeze causing them to become ill. Check your vehicles for leaks and keep all anti-freeze secure and out of your pet’s reach.
3. Make your holiday reservations now! As the holidays approach, we get busier and busier. Get your reservations in now with your pet sitters and boarding facilities to make things easier.
4. Be careful with holiday treats! We know the hazards of chocolate but many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets. Here is a quick list of foods to avoid giving to your pet:
Alcoholic beverages
Apple seeds
Apricot pits
Avocados
Cherry pits
Candy (particularly chocolate—which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets—and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Coffee (grounds, beans, and chocolate-covered espresso beans)
Garlic
Grapes
Gum (can cause blockages and sugar free gums may contain the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Hops (used in home beer brewing)
Macadamia nuts
Moldy foods
Mushroom plants
Mustard seeds
Onions and onion powder
Peach pits
Potato leaves and stems (green parts)
Raisins
Rhubarb leaves
Salt
Tea (because it contains caffeine)
Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)
Walnuts
Xylitol (artificial sweetener that is toxic to pets)
Yeast dough

Pet-Safe Garage

posted July 31st, 2016 by
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Pet-Safe

Pet-Safe Garage

Pet parents are responsible for the safety of their furry friends. Many invest in high-tech or “green” pet food, toys and cleaners. Pets are considered part of the family and as such, are typically allowed to go practically anywhere in the home. But there is one place that might pose a threat to pets; the garage. The garage is a repository for all sorts of items, sharp tools, cars that might leak dangerous chemicals, or fertilizers. These items may not seem as dangerous to humans, but they can be deadly to pets. Updating a few things in the garage can transform the space into one that is safe for pets!  

 

Update Lighting:

The typical garage light is dim and poorly illuminates more than a few feet, leaving a good portion of the garage in shadow. Lighting is important when it comes to pulling the family vehicle in and out of the garage. Pets can easily vanish in the shadows and end up in the path of the car. To eliminate those shadowy spaces, switch garage lighting for updated bulbs or add additional lights.

 

Temperature Control:

Pet-SafeMost garages do not have proper insulation so they can get extremely cold in the winter or hot in the summer. Extreme temperatures and beloved pets do not mix. If pets are left in the garage for prolonged periods of time, it’s important to maintain an even and comfortable temperature. The garage door is the most vulnerable to fluctuating temperatures. Add insulated panels to your garage door or invest in a completely new door. It’s also a good idea to add weatherstripping to the garage door to seal the garage against extreme temperatures in winter and summer.

 

Secure Storage Options:

When you walk into your garage do you see garden tools propped up against the walls or stacks of boxes in the corner? Perhaps there is sports’ equipment strewn across the floor? These unreliable storage solutions could harm your furry best friend. They could easily knock items over onto themselves, which could lead to serious harm. Sharp items like shovels and saws should also be stored out of reach of pets. Instead of storing your items haphazardly in the garage, utilize the walls and ceiling. Invest in sturdy shelves or cabinets that easily get your items out of reach of your pets.

 

Separate Storage:Pet-Safe

Because garages are a  catch-all for countless items,these items sometimes get jumbled together. If homeowners are not careful, harmful chemicals could be stored right next to pet food or toys. It’s important to set aside a special and specific place for pet supplies. Store cleaning supplies, fertilizers, or other hazardous items safely behind lockable cabinet doors or up on shelves. Even if cleaning supplies are stored in plastic containers, it is better to store Fido’s gear elsewhere.

 

Be Aware:

This tip is closely related to the lighting tip, but takes it one step further. During the colder months, smaller pets – like cats seek warmth from a variety of places. Felines have been known to seek warmth in the wheelwell or under the hood of vehicles. Before you move any vehicles, it’s always a good idea to take a peek around to ensure no pets are napping nearby.

 

Pet Dishes and Food:

Pet-SafeIf you keep your pet’s food or water dishes in the garage, it’s wise to routinely check that no chemicals or pests have found their way into the dishes. Pet food should always be stored securely, but especially if it is being stored in the garage. Your furry friend’s food can attract some unwanted guests if left open. Don’t go straight for plastic containers for your pet food as they can contaminate it. The best solution for pet food storage is keeping the food in the original bag, inside a sealable container to avoid attracting pests and maintaining the healthiness of the food.

 

Oil, Gas or Chemical Spills:

Most vehicles will leak at some point in their lifespan, leaving pools of oil or coolant behind in the garage. These little spills can be deadly to curious pets. Taking your car in for routine checkups is important if Fido will be poking around in the garage.

 

Taking a few minutes to ensure a pet’s safety is never wasted time. The garage is easily forgotten when it comes to pet safety. Updating lighting, properly storing items and maintaining the separation of pet supplies and other items keeps your pet safe and healthy in the garage. Ensure your pet’s safety and enjoy spending time with your friend while you work on various projects in the garage!

 

For more help getting your garage organized visit http://garagesolutionskansascity.com/

 

BIO:

 

Bri works for Monkey Bars of Kansas City a garage storage and organization company that helps homeowners create custom garage storage solutions. Bri graduated from BYU-Idaho in Advertising and Public Relations. When she’s not working, she enjoys all things film, good books and making memories with her husband and German Shepherd.

 

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