Pet Health

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo?

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo? – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Choosing a shampoo is an important part of your dog’s skin and coat health.

 

Well-known shampoos, such as Hartz Love Your Dog Shampoo, Miracle Coat Premium, Lambert Kay, Sergeant’s Fur-So-Fresh, Natural Research, and Pure Pet’s Pure Care, are among those without the ingredients listed on the label. So what kind of shampoo does your groomer use?

Before I became self-employed, I was amazed at how many groomers use Dawn soap on dogs. The risk of soap burning the skin and eyes is profoundly common. Shampoos containing sulfates, soap and parabens can cause a variety of skin disorders, not to mention they can be toxic and harmful. Even using human shampoo can cause reactions.

We want our pets clean, but we do not want their skin stripped of natural oils. There are many pet shampoos to choose from—just make certain you buy one that is gentle on your beloved pet.

Look for “soap and paraben free” and “pH balanced” when you’re shopping for a safe shampoo. Earthbath Mediterranean Magic is one of our favorites and is used on almost every dog. Another favorite used is Show Season Essential shampoo. We like the way it smells; it has aromatherapy and is infused with organic rosemary, olive and sunflower oil.

You always have the option to take your shampoo with you to your pet’s grooming appointments. If you aren’t sure what is used on your beloved pet, ask to take a peek behind the curtain to ensure your pet is getting the very best!

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

It’s Hot

posted July 5th, 2016 by
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Holiday Gift

It’s Hot – – It’s going to get Hotter

No matter how many ways we say it –

Don’t leave your pets in your car, truck, pick up, SUV, Jeep
– anything that has four wheels, a motor, and windows.

Dogs do not sweat. Let me repeat – – dogs do not sweat. They pant, vigorously, to say cool. When it is hot in a closed up car, their body temperature climbs quickly. Your quick stop at the convenience store, grocery store – – whatever – – will mean tragedy for your pets.

More and more states are passing legislation that makes it legal for a citizen to break a window to rescue an animal in distress. No Oklahoma hasn’t passed it yet. It’s a band wagon we should be on – – but we’re not.

The Fourth of July has come and gone. Rescues and municipal shelters have been inundated with lost, frightened, scared pets. Add to that the pets that will be left in locked cars – – – it is overwhelming for all of us who work in rescue.

Look at the picture – – look at your pet. Do the right thing when it comes to your mode of transportation and the animals who trust you.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

It's Hot

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends

posted June 30th, 2016 by
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Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Nowadays, everyone is focusing on wellness, and caring for our furry friends is no exception.  I get asked almost every day by pet owners how to get rid of pet odors. Whether it is goopy eyes or stinky ears and skin, my answer is always the same—coconut oil!

I’ve been in the dog grooming industry since 1997. We always use natural and botanical products at Mia & Company.  Sometimes that isn’t enough.

Fed regularly to pets, coconut oil can have many health benefits for their skin, digestive and immune systems, metabolic function, even their bone and brain health! Here are some of my top reasons for adding coconut oil to your dog’s diet:

Coconut oil improves overall skin health and clears up skin conditions such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis and itchy skin. It can reduce bad breath. Dog lovers even brush their pets’ teeth with it, as they love the taste.

Incredibly emollient, coconut oil helps moisturize the driest skin and makes a dog’s coat gleam with health—whether you add it to her diet, her shampoo or both!

Applied topically to the skin, coconut oil promotes the healing of cuts, wounds, hot spots, bites and stings.

The antibacterial and antifungal properties of coconut oil help reduce doggie odor, and the pleasant, tropical aroma imparts a delightful scent to a dog’s skin and coat.

Coconut oil prevents and treats yeast infections, including candida. The antiviral agents also help dogs recover quickly from kennel cough.

I would recommend starting your pet on a low dose. If you have a small dog or cat, less than 15 pounds, start out using a one-fourth teaspoon.  If you have a medium to large breed, start out using one-half teaspoon. Once applied to their dog food, it absorbs immediately. Any brand will work but make sure it’s unrefined.

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

Spring Kittens

posted April 29th, 2016 by
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Spring Kittens

ALLEY CAT ALLIES

Five tips to Help Spring Kittens

Photo Gallery Demonstrates Each Tip

BETHESDA, Md., USA – April 12, 2016 – As springtime begins so does “kitten season” – when babies are born to cats who have not yet been spayed or neutered. People don’t always know the best way to help these kittens. Sometimes taking home a kitten found outdoors is the best way to help and sometimes it’s best to leave them outdoors with mom – it all depends on the situation.

“If you come across a kitten outdoors, you may be tempted to bring her home with you, but that may not be the best thing for the kitten,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies. “Deciding whether to take a kitten home with you or leave her where she is should be carefully considered based on the individual kitten’s situation and age.”

Alley Cat Allies, the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the humane treatment of cats, offers five easy ways people can help cats and kittens this spring. Visit www.alleycat.org/Kittens for a comprehensive guide to caring for kittens.

Tip #1: Leave kittens with mom.

Like all babies, kittens are best left with their mothers who instinctively know how to help their offspring grow up to be strong and healthy cats. Neonatal kittens, four weeks old or younger, need around the clock attention and depend on mom for 100 percent of their care. Kittens five to eight weeks old can begin to eat wet food but are still being weaned. (To determine the age of a kitten, use Alley Cat Allies’ Kitten Progression Guide at www.alleycat.org/KittenProgression.)

If you know the mother is present, it is best to leave kittens with her. To determine whether the mother is caring for the kittens, wait and observe for two to four hours to see if the mother returns. She could just be out looking for food. If she doesn’t return, the kittens could be abandoned. A young kitten living outdoors who does not have a mother present should be taken in and fostered.

If you are unsure, Alley Cat Allies has a number of resources available to help. The Alley Cat Allies’ National Cat Help Desk can provide advice and direction for a number of situations. Another option is the Alley Cat Allies’ Feral Friends Network – local individuals and organizations that may be able to help with hands-on advice, information about borrowing equipment, and veterinarians or clinics that can spay and neuter feral cats. To request a list of Feral Friends in your area, visit www.alleycat.org/FeralFriends.

Tip #2: Don’t bring neonatal kittens to an animal shelter.

Most shelters are not equipped or trained to provide the necessary round-the-clock care for neonatal kittens. If a kitten can’t eat on her own, she will likely be killed at the shelter. Realistically, it’s never a good idea to take a cat to a shelter, no matter the age or level of socialization. There are some shelters who have lifesaving programs for cats, but across the nation, more than 70 percent of cats who enter shelters are killed. That number rises to virtually 100 percent for feral cats. Killing is never the answer—it is inhumane and it fails to stabilize or reduce outdoor cat populations.

Tip #3: Volunteer as a kitten foster parent for a local rescue group.

There are kitten foster parent programs across the country. Though it is an investment of time and requires training, volunteering to foster young kittens is lifesaving and rewarding. To learn the basics of kitten care, register for Alley Cat Allies’ free “Help! I found a kitten!” webinar at www.alleycat.org/KittenWebinar.

Tip #4: Support and practice Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR).

TNR is the only effective and humane way of stabilizing and reducing community cat populations. In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped and brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and eartipped (the universal symbol that a cat has been neutered and vaccinated) before being returned to their outdoor homes. Learn more about TNR at www.alleycat.org/TNR.

Spaying and neutering community cats prevents new litters, drastically reducing the impact of kitten season. Cats as young as four months can have litters, so it is important to spay and neuter kittens as soon as they are ready. A good rule of thumb is the 2 Pound Spay/Neuter Rule – kittens can be safely spayed or neutered at two months of age or as soon as they weigh two pounds. Learn more about pediatric spay and neuter at www.alleycat.org/spayneuter.

Tip #5: Advocate for policies and programs that protect cats.

Contact your shelter and local officials and tell them you support lifesaving policies for cats, including spay and neuter funding and spay and neuter before adoption. Write letters and call in support of community outreach and education programs that spread awareness about spay and neuter, community cats and TNR – you can make a big difference. Learn how you can help your local shelter save more cats’ lives at www.alleycat.org/HelpShelters.

Visit www.alleycat.org/5KittenTips for the Alley Cat Allies “Kitten Season” photo gallery and download high-resolution images for each tip.

###

About Alley Cat Allies

Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Md., is the only national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 600,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide. Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Ticks on Your Pets

posted April 29th, 2016 by
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Ticks

Ticks On Your Pets

How to check for and remove

Checking for Ticks on Dogs and Cats
Carrington.edu emphasizes the importance of regular, thorough tick checks to avoid potentially dangerous tick-borne diseases. The procedure is pretty straightforward:
Check the entire body, including between toes, inside ears, under armpits and around the face.
If you find a tick, prepare to remove it immediately. You will need alcohol, gloves and tweezers to do so.
Latch onto the tick as close to the dog’s skin as possible.
Pull the tick straight up.
Kill the tick and place it inside a dated jar in case you need to have it tested later.
Disinfect the area where the tick latched on.
Give your dog a treat as a reward for its patience.
Preventing Tick Infestation
While it is impossible to guarantee that your pet will never get ticks, you can prevent infestation by cutting the grass regularly, clearing brush from around your home and avoiding walks through the forest, according to PetMD.com. A variety of shampoos, topical treatments, tick collars and other treatments are available, which either stop ticks from latching onto your dog or kill them as soon as they do. Consult your veterinarian to see which treatment options he or she recommends.
Keeping your new pet tick-free will keep it healthy and happy and prolong its life. Make it a priority to do a tick checkup before you let your new dog in the house. The sooner ticks are caught and removed, the less likely your dog will be to contract a tick-borne illness.

Ticks

Dog Food for the Slow Cooker

posted April 29th, 2016 by
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Dog Food

Dog Food

Dog Food for the Slow Cooker

Written By Amica Graber

2016.04.20 – 4:45pm

The harmful impacts of processed dog food are frequently underplayed. Meat is often sourced from the abattoir leftovers, and according to one horrific exposé, even euthanized pets can sometimes go into the manufacture of dog food.

On the flipside, preparing your dog’s meals at home can save you cash, and some say that it can help your dog live longer.

I can barely throw my own meals together, so if you’re skeptical — I get it. Luckily, there has always been one invention in my kitchen that has been a godsend when I can’t get it together: the slow cooker.

Slow cooking your dog’s meals takes all of the hard work out of cooking. Have you got a refrigerator drawer of crumpled-looking carrots that you abandoned in favor of takeout? Throw ‘em in the slow cooker for your lil buddy! Didn’t get round to finishing that chicken? TO THE SLOW COOKER!

But, there are some caveats to DIY dog food. For some reason, feeding dogs cheese is pretty popular right now. I fed my dog cheese once, and perhaps he has a touch of Gwyneth Paltrow about him, but it made him sick as — well, a dog.

Dogs love eating cheese. So do I, for that matter. However, dogs don’t have the lactase in their stomachs to break it down efficiently, which can lead to diarrhea (check), odious gas (double check), and even long-term digestion issues.

To navigate the murky land of knowing what to feed your pet, we designed this nifty infographic to make it as easy as pie.

Slow Cooker Dog Food

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