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What’s in Your Dog Shampoo?

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo? – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Choosing a shampoo is an important part of your dog’s skin and coat health.

 

Well-known shampoos, such as Hartz Love Your Dog Shampoo, Miracle Coat Premium, Lambert Kay, Sergeant’s Fur-So-Fresh, Natural Research, and Pure Pet’s Pure Care, are among those without the ingredients listed on the label. So what kind of shampoo does your groomer use?

Before I became self-employed, I was amazed at how many groomers use Dawn soap on dogs. The risk of soap burning the skin and eyes is profoundly common. Shampoos containing sulfates, soap and parabens can cause a variety of skin disorders, not to mention they can be toxic and harmful. Even using human shampoo can cause reactions.

We want our pets clean, but we do not want their skin stripped of natural oils. There are many pet shampoos to choose from—just make certain you buy one that is gentle on your beloved pet.

Look for “soap and paraben free” and “pH balanced” when you’re shopping for a safe shampoo. Earthbath Mediterranean Magic is one of our favorites and is used on almost every dog. Another favorite used is Show Season Essential shampoo. We like the way it smells; it has aromatherapy and is infused with organic rosemary, olive and sunflower oil.

You always have the option to take your shampoo with you to your pet’s grooming appointments. If you aren’t sure what is used on your beloved pet, ask to take a peek behind the curtain to ensure your pet is getting the very best!

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

Indoor vs Outdoor Cats

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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Beat the Heat

Indoor vs Outdoor Cats

by Mira Alicki

Indoor vs Outdoor CatsImmediately one pictures packs of lions in Africa or a lone cheetah chasing down its prey. Cats are natural born explorers and hunters and domesticated cats retain that instinct whether they are raised outdoors or not. Many cat owners come to crossroads of having to choose what environment they want to raise their feline in: outdoors or indoors. If you are unsure of which option to choose, we’ve compiled a list to help with your decision.
Health

DISEASE. The biggest concerns for outdoor cats are feral and homeless cats that may come in contact your own. The American Feral Cat Coalition estimates that there are about 60 million feral and homeless cats living in the United States alone. Many of these cats carry a number of potentially fatal or dangerous diseases such as:

• Feline leukemia (FeLV)
• Feline AIDS (FIV)
• FIP (feline infectious peritonitis)
• Feline distemper (panleukopenia)
• Upper respiratory infections (or URI).

The first two listed, FIV and FeLV, are highly contagious and fatal. If your cat is going to spending any time outside, make sure you take them to get additional health care and vaccinations to protect against these diseases.

PARASITES. In addition to diseases, many outdoors attract fleas and bring them into the home. Even with a flea collar, cats may bring in parasites from the outside depending on their environment. Some other parasites that your cat may pick up during their outdoor exploration are:

• Ticks
• Ringworm (a fungal infection)
• Ear mites
• Intestinal Worms

These parasites not only cause moderate to severe symptoms to your feline but may also be spread to you and your family. Once a parasite has hitched a ride into your home, it is often times difficult to fully eradicate them from your home.

EXERCISE. The outdoors is the optimal environment for your cat when it comes to exercise. They are free to run wild and explore on their own. This also means getting fewer toys to keep them entertained indoors and less time spent helping them get the exercise that they need. Cats that spend all of their time indoors can become:

• Dependent on their owners for simulation: this can cause a cat to become stressed when the owners are absent and unable to entertain themselves.
• Clingy when they owner is home: this can cause a cat to become less welcoming to strangers or others who enter their home and take time away from their owner.
• Destructive to furniture: even with stretching posts and proper care, indoor cats may find expensive furniture to satisfy their needs and destroy them.

If you do allow your feline to venture outside, remember to:

• Protect your feline from other cats and animals. Keep them on a leash or let them out in a confined area like your backyard, where they are less likely to run into them.
• Keep a careful watch on your cat when they’re outdoors
• Periodically visit the veterinarian to screen for parasites and diseases and keep their vaccines up-to-date.
Safety

CARS. In addition to feral and homeless cats that can attack your feline, cars cause many feline deaths. A popular and false belief is that cats have an innate instinct to avoid busy roads and cars, which is completely false. Cats are just as likely to run into the busiest road as a dog is.

ANIMAL CRUELTY. For whatever reason, there are people like to inflict abuse to wandering animals. Any roaming cat is a risk to be attacked or shot with a BB gun or arrows. Some felines end up being trapped and then abused and/or killed “for fun.”

OTHER ANIMALS. Thanks to the reputation of larger felines such as lions and cheetahs, cats are considered to be exceptional hunters. While domesticated cats also make exceptional hunters, they often find themselves being the hunted, not the hunter.

Depending on your location, domesticated cats are at risk of being hunted by:

• Loose or stray dogs
• Coyotes
• Raccoons
• Foxes
• Crocodiles

Many bites from these animals are serious and can often lead to death. While you can’t control wild animals, you can control where your cat explores. Keep an eye on your feline and keep them in a safe and confined area.

TOXINS AND POISONS. Felines often come in contact with dangerous and toxic substances that are being used to kill off other pests. Common toxins that cats can come in contact with are antifreeze or rodent poisons.

TREES. In popular culture, cats are found in stuck high up in a tree and are often saved by some hero walking by. When these cats find themselves stuck high in a tree, the will be unable or too scared to climb down and end up staying there. If not rescued quickly, the cat can become severely dehydrated and weak that they end up falling with severe to fatal injuries.

Environmental

HUNTERS. Cats have a reputation for having such a strong prey drive that they often hunt just for sport and “for fun.” Their prey tends to be birds or other small animals. While the impact of one domesticated cat doesn’t seem that much, it is estimated that cats kill hundreds of millions of birds every year with feral cats only killing 20% of that number.
Indoor Cats

The main concern for indoor cats is their stimulation and exercise. As they spend the majority of the life inside the house, it falls upon the owner to provide both. Here are some suggestions to keep your indoor cat from becoming too fat and lazy:

• Get a companion for your cat: whether it is another feline or a dog, a companion will keep your feline company while you’re away while also providing exercise, affection and companionship.
• Interactive food toy: instead of just dumping food into their bowl, make your feline work for it. By putting the dry food inside a toy, they have to play with the toy to get the food out forcing them to exercise for their food.
• Scratching posts: avoid having your feline destroy your furniture by buying a post where they can satisfy their natural instinct to scratch at objects.
• Create the perfect environment: by buying items for your cat as cat trees, cat perches (that face the sun), and hiding places to provide simulation and comfort to your feline companion.

-Mira Alicki is a jewelry designer and goldsmith for the past 22 years. Her passion for animals led her to create her own line of jewelry and online store to benefit charities. 40% of each purchase is donated back to the animal community. You can find Mira on Twitter (@FIMHjewelry) or Forever In My Heart.

It’s Hot

posted July 5th, 2016 by
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Holiday Gift

It’s Hot – – It’s going to get Hotter

No matter how many ways we say it –

Don’t leave your pets in your car, truck, pick up, SUV, Jeep
– anything that has four wheels, a motor, and windows.

Dogs do not sweat. Let me repeat – – dogs do not sweat. They pant, vigorously, to say cool. When it is hot in a closed up car, their body temperature climbs quickly. Your quick stop at the convenience store, grocery store – – whatever – – will mean tragedy for your pets.

More and more states are passing legislation that makes it legal for a citizen to break a window to rescue an animal in distress. No Oklahoma hasn’t passed it yet. It’s a band wagon we should be on – – but we’re not.

The Fourth of July has come and gone. Rescues and municipal shelters have been inundated with lost, frightened, scared pets. Add to that the pets that will be left in locked cars – – – it is overwhelming for all of us who work in rescue.

Look at the picture – – look at your pet. Do the right thing when it comes to your mode of transportation and the animals who trust you.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

It's Hot

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

posted July 4th, 2016 by
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Blaze's

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

17667 Markita Dr.  Jones, OK  73049

(405) 399-3084 or (405) 615-5267

[email protected] www.blazesequinerescue.com

Federal I.D. 43-2024364

 

June 28, 2016

 

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, Inc. located in Jones, Oklahoma, is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that strives to improve the lives of neglected, starved, and abused horses.  We provide equine rescue regardless of age or disability.  We promote and teach horse care and humane, natural methods of training horses.  Our primary focus is Animal Cruelty Cases.  We work closely with the Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division and the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office with their Equine related Animal Cruelty Cases.  We also assist any other local/rural county sheriff’s office who request our assistance.

 

Rescues:

 

It’s been a busy year with assisting several rural county sheriff’s office this year.  We assisted with 2 extreme cruelty cases in March and April.  In March we assisted Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Office with a seizure of 9 horses.  We arrived to find horses in extremely emaciated condition and 3 dead horses on the property.  We removed the 9 horses but knew several were in critical condition.  Unfortunately, we lost one just a few days after the seizure.  She was just too tired and weak and she seemed to have already given up when we arrived.  We prayed she would pull through once she saw she was safe and had fresh water and food.  The remaining 8 horses have been doing well and thriving. 

 

We also assisted Blaine County Sheriff’s Office with a seizure involving 8 horses and 26 cattle.  This was a devastating scene as we found so many dead animals, that it came to a point that we had trouble keeping count.  The amount of bones and full carcasses we found was completely devastating.  We counted roughly 46 dead cows, and the remains of horses were hard to determine, but we believe we found at least 6.  We don’t typically do cattle rescue, but we wanted to help and decided that we could stretch our means and help out, so that we could get all those animals to safety.  Everyone is still on the road to recovery, but doing well. 

 

So far for this year, we have rescued 32 horses and 26 cattle.  Adoptions are down and we are desperately asking for anyone interested in adding a horse to your family, to please come visit the horses in our program.  We are currently caring for 123 horses and have many nice horses that desperately need their forever, loving home.  We are also asking for donations to assist with training of a few of the green broke horses that have been here for over a year.  If we can get these guys off to training that would enhance their adoptability.  Sadly, our needs don’t stop there, we also need donations to care for the horses in our program.  We have experienced several medical needs this year, several foundered horses, a crypt-orchid that required surgery at OSU, several eye injuries, which one resulted in having surgery to remove the eye and so much more.  The daily cost to care for these beautiful creatures can become quite taxing.  Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated.  Every little bit helps tremendously!  We currently have 123 horses in our program.  Your generosity has helped us save over 1326 horses and 26 cattle.  We can’t thank you enough!  Here are just a few of our current rescues that need your support. 

 

Apricot came into our rescue program on April 04, 2016.  Apricot came from the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office along with 7 other horses and 26 cattle as a cruelty case.  Sadly, help came too late for so many other cows and horses.  These beautiful animals have been ignored for far too long.   Apricot is a Beautiful, Palomino, Quarter Horse, Mare.  Apricot is estimated to be 20 years of age.  Apricot is extremely emaciated, body score of a 1, infested with internal and external parasites.  Apricot is a sweet girl, but takes her a minute to warm up to attention.  She hasn’t received much hands on attention in her life and it is clear that everything we do for our horses, she isn’t used too. This sweet girl has a long road of recovery ahead of her.  She is slowly gaining weight.  Please consider making a donation towards Apricot’s Rehabilitation.

 

Felicity came into our rescue program on March 18, 2016.  Felicity came from the Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Office along with 8 other horses.  Sadly, help came too late for 3 horses that suffered and died a slow death of starvation and neglect.  The sadness each horse exhibited during the seizure was truly heartbreaking.  Many of them seemed to believe that they would die on that property just like their pasture mates.  Felicity is a Beautiful, Sorrel, Quarter Horse, Mare.  Felicity is estimated to be 4 years of age.  Felicity is extremely emaciated, body score of a 1, and infested with internal/external parasites.  Felicity is such a sweet girl and slowly gaining weight.  This sweet girl has a long road of recovery ahead of her.  Please consider making a donation towards Felicity’s Rehabilitation.

 

Adoptable Horse of the Month:

 

 Ridley is a beautiful, Sorrel/White, Paint, Mare.  She is estimated to be 9 years of age.  She has received an extensive amount of training with Kelci Goad of Saddle Up Horsemanship.  She is an excellent trail horse and really enjoys trail riding.  She seems to be in her element when hitting the trails.  Ridley loves attention, she is always quick to come up and visit with you.  She would make someone an excellent addition to their family.  If you are looking for an awesome trail riding partner, please schedule an appointment to come visit this sweet girl.  She has a current negative coggins, up to date on vaccinations, deworming, teeth floating, and hoof maintenance.  Her adoption fee is $800.00.  Remember, our adoption fee’s go back into our program to help the next horse that comes to our rescue.  When you adopt a horse, you save 2 lives.  The one you adopted and the one you opened space up for a rescue to come in. 

 

  Hi Hopes is a beautiful, Bay/White, Paint, Pony, mare.  She is estimated to be 13 years of age.  Hi Hopes is 13 hands tall.  Hi Hopes recently went through Saddle Up Horsemanship’s training camp, where Kelci has 4 young students that aspire to be horse trainers.  Hi Hopes was paired up with Halle Barker.  Halle spent a solid week from 8:00 am till 5:00 pm working with Hi Hopes and preparing her for her forever, loving home.  Halle and Hi Hopes bonded quickly and she helped Hi Hopes come out of her shell.  Halle has done a lot with this sweet girl.  Hi Hopes would be a great lead line pony, pony party pony, or for any direction you want to take her.  She just needs a family of her own where she can bond and continue to excel.  Schedule an appointment to check this sweet girl out.  She would make someone an excellent addition to their family.  Hi Hopes has a current negative coggins, up to date on vaccinations, deworming, teeth floating and hoof maintenance.  Her adoption fee is $600.00.  Remember, our adoption fee’s go back into our program to help the next horse that comes to our rescue.  When you adopt a horse, you save 2 lives.  The one you adopted and the one you opened space up for a rescue to come in.    

 

We have so many wonderful horses in our program, and so many with needs that ask for your assistance.  From horses with lameness issues that need treatment, to horses with severe fungus issues, eye injuries, emaciation, wounds, hernia surgeries, castrations, EPM treatment, squamous cell carcinoma, teeth floating, vaccinations, deworming, etc., our horses are our top priority and it takes a lot to properly care for so many rescued horses.  Whether you make a monetary donation, adopt a horse, or simply say a prayer for Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, we truly appreciate your support.

 

Because of YOU and your heartfelt generosity, we are able to save these horses and many others from an uncertain death.  We ask for your assistance as we have so many more horses in our program that need your help.  Our average monthly expenses now total $8500.00.  If you can please help us, continue to save rescued horses, please make a donation to:

 

 

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

17667 Markita Drive

Jones, Oklahoma  73049

 

or you can donate on-line through paypal @

www.blazesequinerescue.com

 

Or you can contact our Veterinarian directly and apply a payment to our account

Exclusively Equine Veterinary Services at 405-973-5740

 

We are currently caring for 123 horses in our rescue program.  We have many wonderful horses that are seeking their forever, loving homes.  I hope that you will consider adopting a rescued horse.  Whether you are able to make a donation or adopt a rescued horse, both help us tremendously. 

 

Blaze’s Annual Benefit Play Day

 

We will be having our Annual Benefit Play Day on Saturday, July 23rd, 2016 at the Schrock Park Arena in Tuttle, Oklahoma.  Come join us for a day of family fun.  Gates open at 4:00 pm, books open at 5:00 pm and events start at 7:00 pm.  Barrels, Flags, Poles and an obstacle course.  All age groups from lead line to over 40.  NO CASH PAYOUTS!!  Participants that pre-register online will receive a play day t-shirt in their size.  Events are $10.00 each run!  Mark your calendars and plan to come out for a relaxed evening enjoying your horse.  Adopted rescued horses are encouraged to come!  All proceeds benefit Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, Inc., Location:  Schrock Park Arena, 900 W. Main, Tuttle, Oklahoma 73089.  You can pre-register online here: http://blazes.fatcatphotos.com/blazes/playday.

 

 

Blaze’s Haunt for the Horses Benefit Trail Ride

You are invited to join us October 22nd, 2016 for our 7th Annual Blaze’s Haunt for the Horses Benefit Trail Ride at Honey Lee Ranch in Jones, Oklahoma.  You can learn more about Honey Lee Ranch at www.honeyleeranch.comCheck in begins @ 9:00 am. Guided and Self-Paced rides will begin to leave at 10:00 am.  Lunch will be served at the pavilion at 12:30 and the costume contest starts at 2:00 pm.  Come join us for treats on the trail, door prizes, drawing, and good times with friends.  All proceeds benefit the horses in our rescue program.  Pre-Registration will be available on September 1st.  Registration covers T-Shirt, Lunch, and Trail Fee’s. 

 

5th Annual Blaze’s Ride to the Rescue Trainer’s Challenge

They say they can gentle an untrained horse.  Now, Seventeen Oklahoma Horse “Whispering” Trainers are competing to prove that point – this time with rescued horses at the 5th Annual Blaze’s Ride to the Rescue Trainer’s Challenge on May 21, 2016.  The horses, some just 3 years old, have already struggled through the hardships of extreme neglect and abuse and will now have an opportunity to demonstrate their inspiring spirit.  The Challenge is an event designed to showcase the skills of local equine trainers, while increasing the adoptability of previously untrained rescue horses.

 

On January 9, 2016, area trainers were given an hour to observe and evaluate their potential equine partners for the competition.  We had 17 Trainer’s to kick off the event and we had 25 horses for the Trainer’s to choose from.  We don’t ever want the last trainer to pick, to feel like they were stuck with a particular horse, so there is always plenty to pick from, even if you are the last trainer to draw.  The trainer’s names were then drawn from a hat to determine selection order.  The draw went in this order:

 

  1. Christa Caho picked Rossi
  2. Jordan Connelly picked Mazie Mae
  3. Kai Fontenot picked Misty
  4. Angie Sack picked Firebug
  5. Davina Sisson picked Patch of Color
  6. Ken Hallam picked Cooter Brown
  7. Kelci Goad picked Timmy
  8. Kaidyn Lopez picked Morton
  9. Adam Miller picked Boardwalk
  10. Jules Curry picked Lasso
  11. Zeke Zacharias picked Zanetta
  12. Robert Hayes picked Valor
  13. Kami Woodard picked Fallon
  14. Scott Williams picked Lariat
  15. Greg Morris picked Halogen
  16. Christina Butler picked Nitro
  17. Abby Ocker picked Prancer

 

After the draw, the trainers are able to halter their horse and load up to start their 120 day training.  For me, it’s like watching your kids go off to college.  You get to watch these horses excel and turn into the wonderful riding partners that we knew they could be.  Of course, the challenge is just that, a challenge and sometimes these horses can really put us to the test.  But, I think that it takes great courage to know when you and a horse you are training recognize your limits.  Not all horses and trainers will get along!  Sometimes the horse and the trainer are quick to recognize the holes in each other.  So, as we approach competition, things start to change.  Sadly, we had one trainer that dropped out.  The challenge presented, Davina approached us with her concerns regarding Patch of Color. We wanted to make the situation with Patch and Davina the best we could.  Davina had accomplished so much with Patch during the 90 days she had him.  His ground manners were excellent, he loaded in a trailer and he gained the foundation he needed to become a great riding partner.  The only set back, Patch had some fear issues that resulted in bucking.  So, we wanted to take that opportunity to help Patch succeed and help Davina move forward.  We had Patch of Color evaluated and determined that he needed a strong leader to help him free up his legs, gain control of his power source and work on getting his hind end disengaged and loosen him up where he wasn’t so stiff, so that he is able to move more freely and without concern of bucking.  With the wonderful help of Greg Morris, Greg took the last 30 days and worked Patch through his rough spots.  Although this is a challenge, sometimes unique situations arise.  We always try to do what is in the best interest of our rescued horses.  Davina and Greg worked together to help Patch of Color transition into the amazing horse he is today. 

 

After the 120 days of training with these wonderful rescue horses, we all came together for competition on May 21st at the Lazy E Arena.  The energy is unlike anything else you have experienced.  The horses, The Trainer’s, our Board Members and Volunteers, and the Crowd are all excited and eager to see what each horse and trainer have prepared.  We have a full day of competition.  We kick off the event with the Choctaw Drill Team, followed by a flag ceremony with America, Why I love her, then the National Anthem sung by Jerri Hargis and a brief introduction of each Trainer and team.  Each trainer was selected in a draw for order of performance. 

 

  1. Kami Woodard with Fallon
  2. 2.  Ken Hallam with Cooter Brown
  3. Christina Butler with Nitro
  4. 4.  Adam Miller with Boardwalk
  5. Zeke Zacharias with Zanetta
  6. Jules Curry with Lasso
  7. Angie Sack with Firebug
  8. Kaidyn Lopez with Morton
  9. Greg Morris with Patch of Color
  10. 10. Greg Morris with Halogen
  11. Kelci Goad with Timmy
  12. Jordan Connelly with Mazie Mae
  13. Robert Hayes with Valor
  14. Kai Fontenot with Misty
  15. Abby Ocker with Prancer
  16. Christa Caho with Rossi
  17. Davina Sisson with Bindy

 

 

After a long day of amazing performances, it was time to announce the winners.  I certainly couldn’t do the judging.  Everyone done such an amazing job!  We had a panel of 5 judges.  After each performance, the judges turned in their score cards and we inputted the information into a computerized program that collected and calculated the scores.  And the winners are:

 

Youth Division:

  1. Abby Ocker – Team Prancer ADOPTED
  2. Jordan Connelly – Team Mazie Mae ADOPTED
  3. Adam Miller – Team Boardwalk ADOPTED
  4. Jules Curry – Team Lasso ADOPTED
  5. Kami Woodard – Team Fallon ADOPTED
  6. Kai Fontenot – Team Misty ADOPTED
  7. Kaidyn Lopez – Team Morton

 

Adult Division:

  1. Zeke Zacharias – Team Zanetta ADOPTED
  2. Christa Caho – Team Rossi ADOPTED
  3. Kelci Goad – Team Timmy ADOPTED
  4. Angie Sack – Team Firebug
  5. Christina Butler – Team Nitro ADOPTED
  6. Robert Hayes – Team Valor
  7. Greg Morris – Team Halogen ADOPTED
  8. Ken Hallam – Team Cooter Brown ADOPTED

 

Our Trainer’s Challenge is a great event.  It helps horses that wouldn’t otherwise get adopted, as typically people are looking for broke to ride horses.  If you didn’t get a chance to make it out this year, please watch for next year’s event.  We are so proud of the amazing trainer’s that help us out with our wonderful horses.  A huge thank you to our sponsors that help make this event possible.  

 

Do you want to learn more about our rescue efforts and how we operate?  We are thrilled to announce that our full documentary is now online to view.  Our documentary is 44 minutes long, there are moments of laughter, tears, and joy.  This documentary details our lives and how our rescue operates, from the seizures to the entrance of each horse to our rescue, all the way up to our fundraisers.  If you have a few moments to spare, please watch and share.  You can view our documentary here: https://vimeo.com/149973004?ref=fb-share&1

 

Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your continued support!!  We wouldn’t be here today, without each and every one of you!!  Thank you on behalf of the entire Blaze’s Family!  So many horses would be lost without you! 

 

Over 1326 horses saved in the last 16 years!!

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends

posted June 30th, 2016 by
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Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Nowadays, everyone is focusing on wellness, and caring for our furry friends is no exception.  I get asked almost every day by pet owners how to get rid of pet odors. Whether it is goopy eyes or stinky ears and skin, my answer is always the same—coconut oil!

I’ve been in the dog grooming industry since 1997. We always use natural and botanical products at Mia & Company.  Sometimes that isn’t enough.

Fed regularly to pets, coconut oil can have many health benefits for their skin, digestive and immune systems, metabolic function, even their bone and brain health! Here are some of my top reasons for adding coconut oil to your dog’s diet:

Coconut oil improves overall skin health and clears up skin conditions such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis and itchy skin. It can reduce bad breath. Dog lovers even brush their pets’ teeth with it, as they love the taste.

Incredibly emollient, coconut oil helps moisturize the driest skin and makes a dog’s coat gleam with health—whether you add it to her diet, her shampoo or both!

Applied topically to the skin, coconut oil promotes the healing of cuts, wounds, hot spots, bites and stings.

The antibacterial and antifungal properties of coconut oil help reduce doggie odor, and the pleasant, tropical aroma imparts a delightful scent to a dog’s skin and coat.

Coconut oil prevents and treats yeast infections, including candida. The antiviral agents also help dogs recover quickly from kennel cough.

I would recommend starting your pet on a low dose. If you have a small dog or cat, less than 15 pounds, start out using a one-fourth teaspoon.  If you have a medium to large breed, start out using one-half teaspoon. Once applied to their dog food, it absorbs immediately. Any brand will work but make sure it’s unrefined.

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

No Miracle Worker

posted June 24th, 2016 by
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Holiday Gift

No Miracle Worker

The 4th of July – – a day to celebrate what it means to live in America. For those who’ve served our country or lived in a third-world country – – it has a special meaning. There will be picnics, family get togethers, barbecue, homemade ice cream and fireworks – – lots and lots of fireworks.

For those of us who work in rescue, we also know it is the time, each year, that thousands of dogs are lost. The loud noises scare them; they’re in unfamiliar surroundings and they bolt; their collars with ID are not on them; their owners forgot to have them micro-chipped; they’re micro-chipped, but their owners didn’t change the registration from the shelter.

And, on July 5th the phones will start ringing. People will want to drop off a dog they found in their yard; a dog they rescued running down the street; a dog someone dumped in their neighborhood. Likewise, all of us will get calls from frantic pet owners, all too frequently, demanding that we find their dog NOW.

Here’s where the rubber meets the road and it gets interesting. No shelter, no rescue, no one can take in all the dogs that are homeless in this area. Why??? Because there are too many homeless dogs already in shelters and rescues.

There is literally No Room in the Inn.

Soooo – – we will celebrate along with our family and friends, then come to work on Tuesday July 5th, take a deep breath and get ready. Tragically, it happens every year and in areas, like northeast Oklahoma, where there are thousands of homeless dogs and cats – – rescuers will bear the brunt of unhappy adults who expect a Miracle.

And

There Is No Miracle Worker

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

No Miracle Worker