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Grooming

posted January 23rd, 2017 by
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Grooming

Grooming

Grooming isn’t just about your dog looking good.  It plays a much more important roll.

Brushing is only the beginning to a good grooming routine.  But it’s a great place to start.  Brushing not only rids your pet of dead hair, dirt and dandruff, but it also helps to bring out the oils in your dog’s coat.  Spreading the oils helps your dog’s coat remain shiny and healthy.

Taking the time to brush your dog gives you a great opportunity to bond with them and show them you love them.  Making a point to spend time with your dog builds your relationship and increases happiness for both you and your pet.

Grooming is also a good opportunity to look your dog over and check for any problems.  Looking at ears, teeth, paws, etc will allow you to get help earlier and head off potential problems before they become emergencies.

Add teeth brushing, ear cleaning and nail trims to your grooming routine to improve the health of your pet.  The mouth is the gateway to the rest of the body.  Keeping a pet’s teeth clean helps to keep the entire pet healthy.  Trimming nails will ensure the nail doesn’t grow into the paw pad causing pain for your pet.  Excessively long nails can make walking painful and distort the structure of the toes.  Keeping your pet’s ears clean keeps yeast and bacteria from causing bigger problems and keeps them feeling fresh and clean.

The cleaner your pet is, the healthier they are!  Happy Grooming!

Obstruction in Dogs

posted December 30th, 2016 by
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Grooming

Obstruction in Dogs

We can’t even begin to tell you the things we have seen at the ER that cause obstructions in dogs!!  Socks, towels, bedding… the list just goes on and on. 

Intestinal obstruction in dogs refers to complete or partial blockage of fluid and food flow through the small intestines.  This can quickly become a life-threatening situation. 

Symptoms to watch for that can indicate your dog is possibly obstructed include:

Vomiting

Loss of appetite

Straining during bowel movements

Diarrhea

Tarry stools

Inability to defecate

Lethargy

Burping

Excessive drooling

Abdominal bloating

Abdominal pain

Remaining still

Refusing to lie down

 

If you see your pet swallow something that can become stuck in their intestinal tract, take them to the vet immediately!  The vet will work to induce vomiting to try and produce the object.  If this is unsuccessful, the next step is to try an endoscope to pull the object back out with the last resort being surgery to remove the object from the intestinal tract. 

Your pet will require several days of hospitalization to ensure they have recovered completely.  All of this will make an obstruction a costly trip to the vet! 

Check your pets’ environment and remove any items that can potentially cause an obstruction.  Having your pet in a crate when you can’t be around is a good way to ensure they remain safe. 

Holiday Safety Tips

posted December 11th, 2016 by
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Holiday Safety

Holiday Safety Tips for Pet Owners

With the holidays comes visits to Grandmas, and Grandma visiting you.  As we go through the holidays, keep these tips in mind to keep your pet out of the emergency room!

Keep a close eye on wrapped gifts.  We often don’t think about our pets unwrapping presents but with a keen sense of smell, any kind of food or treats wrapped under the tree can become a toxic nightmare for your pet.  Keep any kind of food out of reach of your pets.

Salt can cause life threatening imbalances for pets.  Products like ice melt, salt dough ornaments (even dry) and homemade play dough can all be tempting but terrible treats for animals.

Snow Globes are a common holiday decoration but they contain ethylene glycol which is deadly to animals.  Keep snow globes out of reach for pets and kids! 

Holiday plants can be toxic to dogs.  Keep them in mind when giving a gift to an animal loving friend or when having these in your home:  Lilies, Poinsettias, Mistletoe and Holly.

Make sure everyone keeps their medications out of the pets reach as many human meds can be toxic and dangerous to our fur babies.

Guests can be stressful for animals.  Do your best to keep your pet’s normal schedule and feeding routines.

Do not allow guests or don’t you give into the temptation to feed your pets table food.  The spices and other flavors we add to food can be dangerous to our pets.

Male Cat Urinary Obstruction

posted November 29th, 2016 by
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Holiday Safety

Male Cat Urinary Obstruction

One of the most common challenges we see in the ER when it comes to cats is urinary obstruction in male cats, also commonly called “blocked tom.”  The obstructions are developed when the tube that drains urine from the bladder becomes blocked when mucus, crystals or other small stones are formed in the kidneys and pass down through the bladder and become stuck. 

As a male cat owner, it is important to be aware of this problem and be vigilant in watching for symptoms.  Here are the most common symptoms to keep an eye out for:

~straining to urinate

~frequent urination

~blood in the urine

~painful urination

~inappropriate urination (urinating outside the litter box)

An examination at the first sign of these symptoms is important as urinary blockage can become life threatening if urine can’t empty from the bladder. 

Treatment often requires emergency care as the blockage may need to be flushed with a catheter or surgically removed. 

There are some ways to try and prevent urinary stones and potential blockage.  The following are some good practices for any cat:

~Keep your cat at a healthy weight.

~Give your cat canned food to help increase moisture and which also more closely resembles their natural diet.

~Keep water fresh and clean

~Make sure you have enough litter boxes for your cat/cats

~Minimize stress for your cat

Pets and Kids

posted October 16th, 2016 by
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Grooming

Pets and Kids

Pets and kids can be an amazing combination.  They can also be a disastrous combination when safety measures aren’t taken.  Here are some tips to ensure your kids and pets are the perfect pair:

~Teach your children from an early age not to pull on the ears or tails of animals.  They should also never pinch or squeeze them, or make loud noises.  Teach them to never disturb a dog while it is sleeping, eating or playing with its favorite toy.  

~Teach your child to never approach strange dogs or animals.  Always ask the owner if they can pet the animal first. 

~Never allow your child to reach through a fence to pet a dog or to tease a dog through a fence. 

~Don’t allow pets to lick your child’s face and do your best to keep animals out of a child’s face all together.

~Teach your child to be polite and kind to animals.  Don’t let them do anything to an animal you wouldn’t allow them to do to another child. 

Teaching your child to respect animals allows them the opportunity to have some amazing experiences and possibly even develop a best friend for life! 

 

Fall Tips for Animal Safety

posted October 6th, 2016 by
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Grooming

Fall Tips for Animal Safety

1. Beware of ticks! Just because the weather is getting cool doesn’t mean the ticks are gone. In fact, several species of ticks can survive until the first frost. Keep up your flea/tick prevention to help keep your pets safe from ticks and the diseases they carry with them.
2. The incidents of poison increase during the fall and winter months. We are already seeing cases of rat poisoning this year! If you have pets, rodenticides are just not worth the risk. Seek out other solutions to rid your home of rodents.
Anit-freeze is another poison concern. Propylene glycol is used to make both anti-freeze and used to preserve moisture content in some dog foods. It is sweet tasting, leading both dogs and cats to lick the anti-freeze causing them to become ill. Check your vehicles for leaks and keep all anti-freeze secure and out of your pet’s reach.
3. Make your holiday reservations now! As the holidays approach, we get busier and busier. Get your reservations in now with your pet sitters and boarding facilities to make things easier.
4. Be careful with holiday treats! We know the hazards of chocolate but many fruits and vegetables can also be life threatening to pets. Here is a quick list of foods to avoid giving to your pet:
Alcoholic beverages
Apple seeds
Apricot pits
Avocados
Cherry pits
Candy (particularly chocolate—which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets—and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Coffee (grounds, beans, and chocolate-covered espresso beans)
Garlic
Grapes
Gum (can cause blockages and sugar free gums may contain the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
Hops (used in home beer brewing)
Macadamia nuts
Moldy foods
Mushroom plants
Mustard seeds
Onions and onion powder
Peach pits
Potato leaves and stems (green parts)
Raisins
Rhubarb leaves
Salt
Tea (because it contains caffeine)
Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)
Walnuts
Xylitol (artificial sweetener that is toxic to pets)
Yeast dough

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